Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 20th Global Nursing Education Conference New York, USA.

Day 2 :

OMICS International Global Nursing Education 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Joan Dorman photo
Biography:

Joan Dorman is working as a Clinical Associate Professor in Purdue University Northwest, USA. She has been professionally affiliated with many organizations like the American Nurses Association, Emergency Nurses Association and National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists. She is the one of the board members at Northwest Indiana Safety Patient Coalition and Ethics Committee St. Catherine Hospital. Her research interest includes Professional Nursing Ethics and Nursing Leadership and Management.

 

Abstract:

When I began teaching the final semester clinical of an undergraduate baccalaureate nursing program, I felt comfortable with the content and could speak from recent experience. I had worked in, and managed, an emergency department for many years. As this was the students’ last semester, I stressed time management, prioritization, delegation, and collaboration. There were case studies and examples to draw from. But the face of nursing today has changed dramatically. There are nursing positions that were non-existent not that long ago. There are nurse navigators, transition nurses, documentation and reimbursement specialists, nurse informaticists, nurse liaisons, patient advocates, and many others. I realized these positions were developed in answer to a need, and I felt a responsibility to understand that need and to convey the information to my students. I was already a member of the Ethics Committee of a local hospital. I became a member of a regional safety coalition, with representatives from all the hospitals in the area. I joined an area care coordination coalition, which focuses on transitions in care and includes representatives from skilled care, rehab, pharmacies, medical supply companies, and numerous community resources. All these people, working together, made it clear that there were issues in health care today that lurked below the surface, that were often hidden from nurses, and, certainly, from nursing students. There is little doubt that information of this sort is pertinent and timely, and it should be incorporated into the curriculum. It is especially appropriate in the final semester of an undergraduate program. And, so, I have worked to accomplish this in a manner that can be adjusted to the times and to on-going changes in the healthcare environment.

 

OMICS International Global Nursing Education 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Seema Lall photo
Biography:

Seema Lall is a Registered Nurse for 32 years, graduated from New Delhi, India. She has practiced as Clinician, a Nurse Manager and an Educator both in New Delhi, India and the USA. Major part of her proffessional life was spent in the USA, where she currently resides. At present, she is a Faculty Member in The Harriet Rothkopf Heilbrunn School of Nursing at Long island University, Brooklyn, NY. Her research interests, educational focus and passion is to work with nursing students to enhance their critical thinking skills for error prevention and safe and accurate medication administration. Her focus especially is on the new undergraduate nurses embarking on a journey while transitioning to nursing practice.

 

Abstract:

Nurses are central to providing safe quality care to patients. Perceptions regarding how to build a safe environment for these patients in healthcare facilities vary among healthcare workers. It is evident through substantive research that medication errors compromise patient safety and lead to adverse patient outcomes in healthcare facilities. Making errors is a part of the human experience and nurses as human beings may commit medication errors, as do other health professionals. Research suggests that nurses who commit medication errors may be uncomfortable to report these errors for multiple reasons such as criticism by peers and/or superiors, disciplinary action or termination from their work. To enable a positive change, establish just culture and build a safer healthcare system, there is a need to reflect upon the processes leading to the error rather than blaming individual nurses who committed the error. Appropriate and timely action by healthcare organizations is warranted to provide safety for patients and rebuild confidence and self-esteem of those nurses who were directly involved in these errors. A more recent study emphasized the need for further exploration into the way undergraduate nurses learn to manage interruptions and distractions during medication administration and highlighted the importance of undergraduate nurse education to better prepare students for safe medication administration while facing interruptions. Another study identified support for professional development needed for nurses especially newly graduated nurses as they transition to professional practice. Research also reported supervisor support to be an important factor to promote a positive environment, particularly for the beginner nurses. Additionally, providing nursing students with varied simulated/clinical experiences, utilization of math skills for safe and accurate medication administration at all levels of the undergraduate nursing program is essential. This will bridge the gap between classroom learning and nursing practice thereby; prevent errors for safe and patient care.

 

OMICS International Global Nursing Education 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Kathryn Shaffer photo
Biography:

Kathryn Shaffer has her expertise in curriculum design and technology in higher education. Her doctoral work focused on using technology to conduct interprofessional clinical teaching rounds with a colorectal surgical team. She was an integral part of the undergraduate baccalaureate nursing education curriculum redesign and innovative clinical education change. She has presented nationally on this recognized exemplar curriculum for health care delivery in today’s ever changing environment. She is the Associate Dean for Strategic Initiatives and Innovation at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, PA where her focus is on implementing the mission and vision of the College of Nursing, and develops partnerships that advance nursing education and the profession of nursing.

 

Abstract:

Nurses’ responsibilities are expanding to include a focus on population health, care coordination, and transitions of care. To keep pace with the ever-changing healthcare delivery system, it is important to transform the way future nurses are educated, both in classroom and clinical settings. Nursing faculty at Thomas Jefferson University, College of Nursing in Philadelphia were motivated by the challenge to design a new baccalaureate nursing curriculum aligned with the evidence of national reports and initiatives, and created a new education paradigm to prepare nurses for 21st century practice. Faculty shifted the paradigm from caring for patients to caring for people and transformed from a diseased-based, acute-care-focused curriculum to one promoting a culture of health and multiple new and emerging roles for RNs. This process required a shift in focus from the current BSN prepared generalist to the future professional clinician who is an anticipatory thinker capable of processing information in multiple directions from a variety of starting points along the life and care continuum, able to understand and implement the quality standards of patient safety, care transition, social determinants of health, and cultural considerations. In response, a concept based curriculum with five immersion practicums were created to provide practice opportunities for students to acquire the skill set that can be applied in any care setting. Each immersion is designed for students to spend time in both an acute care setting and areas where people transition along the life and care continuum all in the same semester. This learning environment allows students to understand population health. This new shift in clinical education also focuses on behavioral health which is integrated throughout the entire curriculum. Students learn and practice the skills central to understanding and coping with both behavioral and mental health crisis events as well as chronic management of care.

 

OMICS International Global Nursing Education 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Stephen R Marrone photo
Biography:

Stephen R Marrone is a Nurse Leader experienced in the roles of Educator, Clinician, Administrator, Consultant, Researcher, and Scholar in healthcare and academic settings in the USA and the Middle East. He is board certified in Nursing Professional Development, as a Nurse Executive, Advanced, and in Transcultural Nursing, Advanced. He is a Six Sigma Green Belt, a TeamSTEPPS Master Trainer, a Fellow of the New York Academy of Medicine, and a Leadership Fellow in the Center for Leadership Excellence of the American Association of Critical Care Nurses, a Transcultural Nursing Scholar, and the current 2nd Vice President of the Transcultural Nursing Society.

 

Abstract:

Professional Development Specialists are often appointed based on their clinical expertise rather than their skills as educators. Moreover, mainstream Nurse Educator graduate programs primarily prepare nurses for the nurse educator role in the academic rather than the service setting. Therefore, the purpose of this presentation is to describe an academic-practice partnership designed to meet the need to prepare the next generation of Professional Development Specialists within a large, urban, multi-site health system. The graduate program faculty and the health system nursing leadership worked jointly to identify common goals. The goals were twofold: to academically prepare current health system nursing staff as Nurse Educators who would be able to 1) fill current and future Nurse Educator vacancies within the health system, and, 2) serve as clinical faculty for the school of nursing. The partnership is ongoing and has, thus far, demonstrated successful goal attainment. The curriculum and program outcomes were redesigned to prepare graduates for the nurse educator role across diverse settings with increased emphasis on the professional development and advanced direct-care provider role. Courses are delivered using a learning management system and assignments are based on actual clinical, educational, ethical, and legal situations encountered in clinical practice and in the academic setting. The curriculum is grounded in theories of teaching and learning and evidence-based best practice in educational design, test construction, and evaluation. Formative and summative outcomes are monitored and reported for continuous program improvement. Best practices and lessons learned will be explored.