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26th World Nursing Education Conference(10Plenary Forums - 1Event)

Prague, Czech Republic

ROGANOVIC JELENA

ROGANOVIC JELENA

School of Medicine University of Rijeka, Croatia

Title: PARENTERAL IRON THERAPY IN CHILDREN WITH IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA

Biography

Biography: ROGANOVIC JELENA

Abstract

Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) continues to represent a major public health problem, particularly in infants and young children. It is estimated that 40% to 50% of children under 5 years of age in developing countries are iron deficient. A common etiology of IDA is poor dietary iron intake, especially excessive consumption of cow's milk. Other causes of IDA in children are increased iron requirements during the growth period, inadequate absorption or utilization of iron, and blood loss. The treatment consists of iron supplementation along with improved nutrition. In vast majority of iron-deficient anemic children, oral administration of simple ferrous salts provides effective and inexpensive therapy. Parenteral iron preparations are infrequently indicated, mainly for children with malabsorption or poor compliance. Besides, some adverse reactions reported with intravenous iron administration have led to its limited use in children.

Hospital records were reviewed on 45 children (≤ 18 years of age) who received intravenous infusions of iron sucrose and iron gluconate at the Department of Pediatrics, Clinical Hospital Centre Rijeka, Croatia, between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2015. Patients had a good response to parenteral iron therapy, with a median hemoglobin rise of 2.7 g/dl. There were only three mild adverse reactions. In our experience, parenteral iron is a safe and effective means to treat IDA in children who cannot receive or do not respond to oral iron due to intolerance, poor adherence, or iron malabsorption