Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 26th World Nursing Education Conference(10Plenary Forums - 1Event) Prague, Czech Republic
Courtyard Marriott Prague Airport

Day 2 :

OMICS International Nursing Education 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sally Doshier photo
Biography:

Dr. Doshier is an Associate Professor, the former Associate Dean of the School of Nursing at Northern Arizona University and co-founder of Arizona’s CEP.

Abstract:

In the United States the most common pathway to prepare for licensure as a Registered Nurse (RN) is through technical community college programs for an associate degree (AD). Research and professional organizations have recommended an increase in the number of baccalaureate-educated nurses (BSN) to improve patient outcomes, professional mobility, and preparation for leadership roles. The Institute of Medicine (2011) called for an increase of BSN nurses from 50% of the workforce to 80% by 2020, and encouraged innovative educational pathways and opportunities. But repeated studies demonstrate numerous barriers RNs encounter when they attempt to complete the BSN after the AD. In the state of Arizona, our response has been to develop partnerships between the state university BSN program and community college AD nursing programs in a new approach to nursing education. While dually enrolled in both community college and university, students complete all AD and BSN program requirements concurrently. Using existing curricula for both AD and BSN completion programs, a new sequence of courses was developed that included all pre-requisite science and math, social science and humanities courses, as well as nursing courses in both college and university settings. The result is a pathway that has provided many benefits to students, community college AD nursing faculty and programs, and the population of the state of Arizona. While there were certainly challenges to work out admission and advisement processes, financial aid issues, and the logistics of growth, the outcomes of the program have been gratifying. Since admitting the first 30 students in the summer 0f 2011, more than 750 students have completed both the AD and BSN degrees concurrently, have passed licensing exams and gained employment. More than 800 students are in progress of earning their BSN in 12 partner community colleges in rural and urban Arizona communities.

OMICS International Nursing Education 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Shari Dingle Costantini photo
Biography:

Shari Dingle Costantini has 20 years of experience leading international healthcare staffing organizations.  She is the CEO of Avant, a company she founded in 2003.   She has a BSN from the University of Florida and a MBA from Keller Graduate School of Management in Chicago

Abstract:

International migration has doubled worldwide since 1970, and nurses are increasingly a part of this trend. In 2008, approximately 5.6% of RN positions were filled by nurses educated in other countries (HRSA, 2010).  One of the critical issues is the transition of these migrated nurses to the new health care system and acculturation in a new society. Continuing education is necessary to promote adjustment and provide for a successful transition while ensuring quality patient care. No two countries have the exact same professional practice standards, communication expectations, and/or clinical environments. Patient satisfaction as a result of quality of care, therefore can vary from country to country. Evidence suggests that patient satisfaction levels and quality of care within a host country may be influenced by internationally-educated nurses. Avant Healthcare Professionals specializes in international recruitment and the placement of healthcare professionals within the U.S. healthcare system. Part of their efforts include the implementation of the Clinical Transition Program, which aims to educate and support internationally-educated nurses.  The primary goal of the Clinical Transition Program is to empower the internationally-educated nurse to practice safely and effectively as a professional nurse in the U.S.  In order to assess patient satisfaction and its possible link with the performance of internationally-educated nurses who have participated in the Clinical Transition Program, an electronic 45-item questionnaire was distributed to clinical nurse managers in facilities who staffed Avant nurses. The questionnaire surveyed Avant nurse performance, patient satisfaction, and patient accolades. Further, the following themes were explored: professionalism, cultural adjustment, nurse-patient interaction (overall communication, pain management, medication communication, and responsiveness), nurse-physician interaction, and HCAHPS scores. The survey was completed by 33 clinical nurse managers across the nation. The results suggest a positive association between the performance of internationally-educated nurses who have participated in the Clinical Transition Program and patient satisfaction variables. This presentation explores ways to ensure the success of internationally-educated nurses and the satisfaction of their patients

Keynote Forum

Max Bishop

Director of Clinical Simulation, USA

Keynote: Simulation learning tool in Nursing Education

Time : 09:50-10:30

OMICS International Nursing Education 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Max Bishop photo
Biography:

Dr. Bishop has a passion for assessing and enhancing critical thinking skills in nursing students. His previous academic endeavors supported the constructivists approach to student learning, but applied these theoretical underpinnings to the simulation environment. His research identified the strengths of having simulation integrated into the curriculum for improved outcomes in patient care based on the construction of critical thinking skills from novice to graduate

Abstract:

Statement of the problem:  For decades, simulation has been used as a learning tool in a multitude of industries including healthcare. Human patient simulators allow varying levels of fidelity to mimic authentic patient care. The simulated clinical environment supports demonstration of procedures and ongoing construction of critical thinking. In the clinical area, it progressed to clinical reasoning. There is a shortage of clinical placement sites for teaching nursing students.  The result is multiple nursing programs have had limits placed on their enrollments or have cancelled expansion plans.  The shortage of clinical sites is compounded by the shortage of qualified nursing faculty.  Clinical sites have decreased numbers of students permitted in each clinical group, also. Nursing administrators have found an alternative solution using simulation whereby a group of students can participate in patient care in a simulated patient care arena. 

Methodology: A quantitative, quasi-experimental, cross sectional, four-group design was designed to examine the impact on using Human Patient Simulations on students’ critical thinking skills.  A sample of 100 students were enrolled in one of two campuses of the same program in the U.S. using the same curriculum.  One program had 25% of their clinical hours performed in a simulation lab, whereas, the other campus had the previous traditional clinical hours performed in acute care or long term care settings without simulation.  All students completed the California Critical Thinking Skills Test at the beginning and end of their nursing program.  

Findings and Conclusion: The results supported previous studies that demonstrated a correlation between six variables and improved critical thinking scores when simulation was integrated into a curriculum rather than using clinical sites alone for learning care of patients. The clinical education experience to gain critical thinking skills and move toward clinical reasoning was enhanced through the use of human patient simulators in a nursing lab experience

OMICS International Nursing Education 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Lonnie Wederski photo
Biography:

Dr. Wederski is an experienced clinician, educator and administrator. He currently serves as associate clinical professor at Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff, Arizona. Prior to this Dr. Wederski taught health care administration and nursing at Capella University. In addition to teaching Dr. Wederski has enjoyed a career in health care administration, serving in various director and executive director roles, primarily in psychiatry.

Abstract:

In the United States the most common pathway to prepare for licensure as a Registered Nurse (RN) is through technical community college programs for an associate degree (AD). Research and professional organizations have recommended an increase in the number of baccalaureate-educated nurses (BSN) to improve patient outcomes, professional mobility, and preparation for leadership roles. The Institute of Medicine (2011) called for an increase of BSN nurses from 50% of the workforce to 80% by 2020, and encouraged innovative educational pathways and opportunities. But repeated studies demonstrate numerous barriers RNs encounter when they attempt to complete the BSN after the AD. In the state of Arizona, our response has been to develop partnerships between the state university BSN program and community college AD nursing programs in a new approach to nursing education. While dually enrolled in both community college and university, students complete all AD and BSN program requirements concurrently. Using existing curricula for both AD and BSN completion programs, a new sequence of courses was developed that included all pre-requisite science and math, social science and humanities courses, as well as nursing courses in both college and university settings. The result is a pathway that has provided many benefits to students, community college AD nursing faculty and programs, and the population of the state of Arizona. While there were certainly challenges to work out admission and advisement processes, financial aid issues, and the logistics of growth, the outcomes of the program have been gratifying. Since admitting the first 30 students in the summer 0f 2011, more than 750 students have completed both the AD and BSN degrees concurrently, have passed licensing exams and gained employment. More than 800 students are in progress of earning their BSN in 12 partner community colleges in rural and urban Arizona communities.