Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 20th World Nursing Education Conference Osaka, Japan.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Anat Drach-Zahavy

University of Haifa, Israel

Keynote: Nursing handovers: From standardization to resilience

Time : 10:00

Nursing Edu 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Anat Drach-Zahavy photo
Biography:

Professor Drach-Zahavy earned her PhD degree in Organizational Psychology at the Technicon, the Israel Institute of Technology. From year 2000, she is academic staff at the Department of nursing, the Faculty of Health, and Welfare Sciences, at the Department of Nursing, the University of Haifa, where she now serves as an Associate Professor. As an Organizational Psychologist, her research tries to understand the challenges that health organizations set before managers regarding management, teamwork, and ward's effectiveness. She is particularly interested in effectiveness in terms of safety, and quality of care. Her This endeavor comes at a time of growing recognition in healthcare that its fundamental challenges are organizational, not merely clinical. Hence her research interests focus on:

-Safety- including providers’ safety, patient safety, and effective handover

-Promoting nurses' health, and well-being

Abstract:

Patient's handover has been declared as an area of considerable vulnerability to patient safety as well as a point of resilience, as it presents opportunities to identify, correct and ‘bounce back’ from errors happened in the last shift. This presentation describes findings from four different studies on nursing handovers, delineating the resilience strategies nurses develop to maintain patient safety.

Comparing mental models of incoming, outgoing, and expert nurses of 40 handovers, two seemingly contradictory processes in the shift handover were revealed: a “Chinese whisper effect” and an “information restoration” process, where incoming nurses restructure missing information based, perhaps, on their prior knowledge, experience, and unmediated impression of the patient. Another qualitative study using interviews, showed that nurses rely on cross-checking strategies to make sense of the information gained during handovers. These strategies help identifying ‘red flags’ that help them set priorities, and direct their attention to prevent something bad from happening. Another important resilience strategy, is to involve the patient during handovers. We found that nurses revealed resilience by trying to involve those patients that were less reluctance to participate during handover due to their personality traits. Finally, we demonstrated that engagement with resilient handover strategies was linked to treatment errors in patient care in the following shift. Specifically, face-to-face verbal update with interactive questioning; update from practitioners other than the outgoing; topics initiated by incoming as well as outgoing team, and writing a summary prior to handover – all were significantly and negatively linked to fewer treatment errors.

Thus, a nursing handover should not be viewed only as a telegram, where the outgoing nurse provides concise information on the patient, but rather as a dialogue, where the incoming and outgoing nurse share their perceptions on the patient, ask clarification questions, and together discuss their perceptions of the patient.

Nursing Edu 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Yvonne Parry photo
Biography:

Yvonne Parry is a Senior Lecturer at Flinders University, School of Nursing and Midwifery. Dr Parry’s work exists at the important intersection between nursing/public health and child protection. Dr Yvonne Parry is the consummate balanced academic combining in-depth and extensive collaborative community based research, with quality teaching scholarship informed by practice. She has research projects in child homelessness, domestic violence with elderly women, and in the impact of disaster on families. Importantly a considerable component of her research is translating findings into appropriately developed education and training for service professionals including undergraduate nursing and health professionals.

Dr Parry has demonstrated outstanding leadership in her support of community based initiatives, research activities and evidence-based practice processes. She spends a significant amount of her time working to improve the health and service provision outcomes for vulnerable children. She aims to ensure her research outcomes lead to children having the best start in life and the best chance of reaching their potential. Her research findings have been used by NGOs to improve health access for vulnerable children through the introduction of Nurse Practitioner Clinics and community based student nursing placement in homelessness home visiting services. A service that developed directly from her research on child homelessness. This year she was invited by the state government to work with community leaders on the development of measurable indicators for defining child vulnerability. As she notes, this invitation was in recognition of both her research and practice in this area.

She is secretary for the chapter of Sigma Thea Tau International (STTI) Psi Eta. STTI is the major research association of the nursing profession internationally with over 500 chapters worldwide and headquarters in the USA. In 2016, she was an invited key note speaker at the Social Impact Measurement Network Australia, and is a state member of the national Social Impact Measurement Network Australia.

Abstract:

The keynote presentation will report on two completed research projects which compare the levels of staff and student learning across two community based placements, one in the Vietnam highlands and one in a homelessness service in South Australia. Both community based placements provided health care to vulnerable and disadvantaged population groups. Community placements with vulnerable population groups provide nursing and midwifery students with the confidence needed to care for people with complex health and social issues in acute care settings. These placements enhanced the student’s clinical skills and linkages to psychosocial theories of human development. The Australian research project mixed methods research design allowed for in-depth interviews and correlational analysis to explore the levels of knowledge gained and application to future practice. The findings outline the impact of these community based placements on the student’s future clinical practice. The Vietnam community placement used in-depth, pre and post interviews, with the staff and students providing health clinic services in the rural Vietnam highlands.   Both research project found that the use of community based placements provides important experiences and learning outcomes for students that enhance their future nursing and midwifery practice.

  • Nursing Education
Location: Osaka, Japan
Speaker
Biography:

Amy Reitmaier Koehler is an Associate Professor of Nursing at Winona State University since 2006.  She graduated with a PhD in nursing from the University of Wisconsin- Milwaukee and has presented at multiple local, regional, national and international conferences as well as published several articles focusing on gerontological nursing education. She currently practices as an RN in Hospice at Winona Health in Winona, MN. She teaches both Research and Evidence- based Practice and Caring for the Older Adult to junior level nursing students and has also managed multiple research projects with older adults and students.

Abstract:

With an aging population, it is critical that nurses are educated and prepared to offer quality healthcare to older adults. Incorporating gerontology content into nursing curricula and addressing students' perceptions and career choices in relation to working with older adults are important faculty concerns. The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to examine the impact of a stand-alone course in gerontological nursing on undergraduate nursing students' perceptions of working with older adults and career intentions.  Data were collected from three student cohorts during the spring semesters of 2012 (n = 98), 2013 (n = 80) and 2014 (n = 88) for a total of N = 266.  A survey instrument was administered and completed by students prior to, and following completion of the course. There was an overall significant increase (p = 0.000) in positive perceptions of working with older adults among nursing students following completion of the course. Post-test scores showed no significant difference between these two groups, with both groups having increased perception scores (p = 0.120). Student preferences for working with different age groups suggested an overall increase in preference for working with older adults following the course. A course in gerontological nursing, incorporating learning partnerships with community dwelling older adults, promotes positive perceptions of working with older adults, independently of the quality of prior experience. There was some evidence that students changed their preferences of working with different age groups in favor of working with older adults.

Speaker
Biography:

He is working as Assistant Lecturer in University of Rwanda, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, School of Nursing and Midwifery, in the Department of Mental Health Nursing. He is an experienced teacher/ Nurse educator and specialized in Mental Health Nursing and he is actively involved in academic activities including mainly teaching modules such as Health Measurement and Research, Mental Health Nursing, Psychiatry, Fundamentals of behavioral sciences, clinical placement and he is also an experienced clinician in the field of psychiatric/ mental health and has worked as practitioner and supervisor in the Psychiatric Reference Hospital and District Hospitals. Also, Mr Vedaste BAZIGA is involved in research activities having many research projects (1 already published, and another 1 accepted for publication and remaining 3 in the process of data collection). In addition, Mr Vedaste BAZIGA participates also in community outreach and he is always increasing knowledge and skills through Continuous Professional Development (CPD) in different areas.

Abstract:

Aim
The purpose of the study was to describe mental disorder stigmatising attitudes held by nurses, in a selected district hospital in Rwanda, and to analyse the potential mediating effects of person variables, specifically familiarity, on these stigmatising attitudes.
 
Methodology
 
A quantitative, non-experimental, descriptive research design was used. A self-report questionnaire included person and two scales; Level of Contact Scale (LOC) and Community Attitudes towards Mental Illness - Swedish version (CAMI-S). A sample of 104 (n=102) was achieved and thical approval was obtained. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) Version 21 whereby Non parametric tests were used, Mann–Whitney U Test, Kruskal-Willis H Test and Spearman’s rho correlation coefficient test and significance was determined by Cohen’s guide lines (Pallant, 2013).
 
Results
Participants reported negative stereotypes, in all items on the CAMI-S, related to persons with a mental disorder. Statistical results indicated associations between negative stereotypes and; the younger age group and the less experienced participants are reported as statistically significant. Also, a negative correlation is reported between familiarity and stigmatizing attitudes.
 
Conclusion and recommendation
Results suggest that familiarity has a positive mediating effect on negative stereotypes. To address the issue of stigma, curriculum for undergraduate nursing education should be reviewed to include mental health nursing and clinical practice within psychiatric health facilities. Also, the School of nursing and Midwifery should organize workshops, seminars, conferences and discussions which could include MHCUs to provide testimonies, which will in turn increase the level of contact amongst students and their lecturers.

Speaker
Biography:

Education: BS, 1998 --Taipei medical College, Taipei, Taiwan -- Nursing Master's degree, 2011, National Taipei University of Nursing and Health Science, Taipei, Taiwan-- Graduate Instituate of Health Alliend Education

Experience: Clinical nurse 17 years, BS, RN, Taipei Veterans General Hospital Nursing; Phd student in National Yang-Ming University, Taiwan, Taipei, Taiwan Department , Taipei, Taiwan 2~8 May 2011 Malta ICN conference POSTER presentation.

Abstract:

Objectives:

The purposes of this study were to examine the degree of teaching effectiveness among clinical nursing preceptors and to explore the relationship of teaching effectiveness between preceptors’ self-evaluation and new nurses’ evaluation.

Methods:

The Teaching Effectiveness Questionnaire was used to understand the extent of teaching effectiveness from both clinical nursing preceptors’ and new nurses’ perspectives. This questionnaire included five sub-scales: Maturity of Personal Characteristics, Proficiency of Professional Knowledge, Effectiveness of Teaching Strategies, Harmony of Interpersonal Relationships, and Objectivity of Teaching Evaluation. Descriptive statistics, ANOVA, and Pearson correlation were utilized.

Results:

The results of the research are as follows: (1) The teaching effectiveness was above average rated by both clinical nursing preceptors and new nurse. Harmonious Interpersonal Relationship was rated the highest and Effective Teaching Strategies the lowest. (2) Overall clinical nursing preceptors’ self-evaluation on teaching effectiveness was significantly correlated with new staff nurses’ evaluation on preceptor teaching effectiveness in the positive direction.

Conclusions:

The participants rated teaching effectiveness high in general, and valued having harmonious interpersonal relationship the most. Due to the Effective Teaching Strategies sub-scale scores of teaching effectiveness were low, a few implications can be considered. These include: to promote continuing education on teaching strategies, and to set up peer support network for preceptors to exchange their feedback and experience.

Speaker
Biography:

Yann-Fen Chao completed her PhD study from Rush University College of Nursing in1991. Currently she was a Professor and Chair of Department of Nursing at Mackay Medical College in New Taipei City, Taiwan. Dr. Chao published more than 100 research papers with 41 in SCI journals. She also has been served as an editorial board member of a SCI journal. Her research areas were patient safety, symptom management and nursing education.

Abstract:

Since2006, 8 core competences were proposed by Taiwan Nursing Accreditation Council for 4-year BSN program.  This paper reported a 5-year longitudinal study examining the trajectory of competence development of nursing students of four-year BSN program and related factors. A total of 119 students who enrolled into a 4-year BSN program during 2011 to 2015 were included. They filled-out a structured questionnaire at the end of every semester from their sophomore year to graduation. The results revealed that students had various levels of nursing competencies on their entrance. One big growth was found in their second year after staring clinical practice, indicating the significance of exposure to clinical settings. At their 4th year before graduation, all the students could achieve up to 80% of the 8 core nursing competencies. Among the 8 competencies, “ethical” and “accountable” were the two which always ranked top. The levels of competencies were not correlated significantly with their anxiety levels which were ranged at light moderate. Communication ability accounted most of the variances of total competence scores. Time management had the most significant influence on all 8 competencies. The finding suggested enhancing the curriculum on communication and time management for nursing students.

Key words: BSN program, competence development, nursing student 

Yun-Hsuan Lin

Ching Kuo Institute of Management and Health,Taiwan

Title: Nurses’ self-awareness from group dialogue: A qualitative study
Speaker
Biography:

Yun-Hsuan Lin has completed her master degree at the age of 28 years from National Cheng Kung University. She is a lecturer of Ching Kuo Institute of Management and Health, and doctoral candidate of school of Nursing at Yang Ming University.

Abstract:

Self-awareness can help nurses increase their concern for patients and perceive the patients’ real needs. Conversely, group dialogues help learners engage in self-exploration as well as facilitate their diversified and deep thinking. Therefore, group discussions have been viewed as a feasible nursing education strategy. The purpose of this study was to explore and analyze the development of self-awareness among nurses through group activities. Using a descriptive and qualitative research design, data were collected at 13 sessions of 90-minute unstructured group meetings from October 2014 to January 2015. The group activity process was audio-recorded and transcribed, and the transcripts were further examined through content analysis. The major research findings were as follows: 1. the development of self-awareness includes the three stages, namely mirror reaction, resonance, and awareness; 2. self-awareness includes: (1) a self developed according to others­­­­­­­­—through gaining others’ recognition and being mindful of others’ opinions, and (2) a true self developed through seeing oneself and looking inside oneself. The results of this study can serve as referential information for nursing education to elevate nurses’ self-awareness.

Speaker
Biography:

I am a Saudi nurse with twenty years’ experience in a variety of nursing roles within the hospitals in the Ministry of Health hospitals. In 2008, I joined a hospital nursing education programme at a Maternity and Children’s Hospital, and became actively involved in the development of the nursing education department in order to enhance nursing education standards to improve the quality of nursing care. In 2008 I worked as a clinical educator in a MoH hospital and then my position was up-graded to Assistant Director of Nursing in King Abdul-Aziz Hospital. I decided to upgrade my knowledge to study a BSc at university and then I graduated from the University of Nottingham with a Master’s in Advanced Nursing in 2012. I am currently studying for a PhD at the University of Salford, Manchester UK.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: In Saudi Arabia, a shortage of Saudi nurses has reached a critical point in nursing workforce planning; there is a need to fill nursing positions in order to cover this shortage and meet patients’ needs. Part of the problem is that many intern nursing students (mentees) are placed in demanding roles without sufficient training or adequate preparation. Many mentees in the early stages of developing their skills consider clinical practice to be a challenge for their capabilities. The purpose of this study is to explore the influence of current mentorship programme for mentees to understand how it influences their knowledge, skills, and attitudes.

Methodology: A qualitative case study design has been chosen as a research strategy for this study, as it can provide realistic information about the influence of current mentorship programmes on intern students in two MoH hospitals in KSA in order to understand different perspectives. Data Collection: documentary material using categorisation strategy, i.e. documents from official, formal or informal sources and recordings made during participant observations and semi-structured interviews will be employed and recorded with the stakeholder teams, mentors and mentees.

Participant Observation in clinical settings: Following observation periods, the informal conversations of the study participants and the researcher will be documented to identify first-hand how the mentees reflect on what they learnt in their mentorship programmes. Analysis: Grounded Theory Analysis will be used to analyse the results of documentary analysis, semi-structured interviews and participant observation.

Speaker
Biography:

Elisabeth Jacob is currently the Associate Dean (Nursing) for the School of Nursing and Midwifery at Edith Cowan University. She practiced clinically as a registered nurse for over 20 years in both rural and metropolitan hospitals where she developed her interest in nursing education and workforce. She has experience in nursing management and education and practiced in medical, emergency and intensive care wards. Elisabeth’s research interests include: development of the nursing workforce; skill mix and its effect on patient outcomes; critical thinking and patient outcomes; and mixed methods research.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: The increasing number of complex patients admitted to hospitals requires registered nurses to be able to recognise complications and picking up on deterioration. Advanced critical thinking skills are required to detect early signs of complications. Registered nurses are expected to commence their clinical careers with the appropriate critical thinking skills to ensure safe nursing practice. Despite the importance of critical thinking in ensuring patient safety and enabling detection of changes in patients’ conditions, no standardised critical thinking tool specific to nurses is available in Australia to assess these skills in nursing. The purpose of this study was to develop an assessment tool to measure the critical thinking ability of nurses. Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: A modified Delphi study was used for the development of the critical thinking assessment tool. Funding for the study and ethical approval were obtained in 2016. The case scenarios for the questions were developed using national health data. Face validity was determined by an expert reference group of clinical and academic nurses. Case study answers were developed using a modified Delphi study. Panel members were expert clinicians and educators. Rasch analysis of the questionnaire was used to assess validity and reliability of the tool. Findings: The use of a modified Delphi study and Rasch analysis provided an effective way of developing a validated assessment tool for critical thinking. Conclusion & Significance: Critical thinking skills are vital to ensure patient safety and improve surveillance. This project reported on the development of a critical thinking assessment tool to provide a consistent method of measuring nurses’ critical thinking skills for Australian nurses. The ability to assess this skill will provide health care facilities with greater confidence in the critical thinking skill level of newly graduate registered nurses and ensure high levels of patient care are maintained.

Speaker
Biography:

Karry Ming LIU has completed her PhD from Chiang Mai University 2005. She is the Dean of the School of Health Sciences, Macao Polytechnic Institute. She has published more than 40 papers in international and domestic journals and also several books and book chapters. She has been serving as an editorial board member of couple of journals.

Abstract:

This study aimed at investigation of the stress perceived by nursing students in the clinical learning environment, and reviewing teaching and learning modality of nursing education in Macao. The study recruited 203 nursing students and SINS-CN was used to measure nursing students’ stress. The overall SINS-CN mean score was 3.33 (SD = 0.49), while the scores for different dimensions were 3.03~3.44. Study year had a statistically significant association with stress level(p=0.000~0.026). The high stress scores could be results of inadequate preparation and lack of confidence. Students often worry that any mistake then make will affect their grade and even their status. According to the currently implemented clinical placement procedures, any mistake made by student would be suspended from his/her clinical placement. The other most common stressors were related to the heavy workload. This might be a result of the heavy curriculum with too many clinical placement hours. The 4-year Bachelor of Nursing program in Macao was designed with 160 learning credits, among which 46 credits (1,840 hours) are clinical placement. Another notable result is worth to reflect is that year one students had a highest perceived stress. Though, this result is similar with several other studies’ findings, the consequence is very adverse in Macao context since we found the first year withdrawal rate is incredibly increasing in recent years. It may be a useful way to help junior nursing students to prepare well before clinical placement and adjusting assignments as well as the performance assessment modality.

Speaker
Biography:

Melvin D. Miranda has completed RN, MAN from Manila Central University College of Nursing EDSA, Caloocan City, Philippines.

Abstract:

The purpose of the study is to determine the Nursing Care Management Learning Settings in Relation to Student’s Readiness to Learn: A Basis for An Improved Instructional Program in Nursing. The researcher assessed the BSN III students’ readiness to learn in NCM 103 in terms of the four types of readiness; physical readiness, emotional readiness, experiential readiness and knowledge readiness. The researcher tested if there is a significant difference in the BSN III students’ readiness to learn the NCM 103 subject in classroom, skills laboratory and clinical area.
The researcher utilized Descriptive Comparative Study determining the differences between the standard level of readiness set by the area chairs and the actual level of readiness of the students in terms of the four types of readiness mentioned. Out of the one hundred thirty five (135) students, which is the total population, twenty seven (27) were taken as respondents. 27 BSN III students represents 20% of the total third year population, thus, simple convenience sampling is used. The researcher simply took the available students as respondents of the study who are enrolled in NCM 103 and on the entry-level competency. The respondents were given a self-constructed open ended questionnaire which was derived from the book of Susan Bastable “Nurse as Educator.” The questionnaire is derived from the explanation contained in this material which was conceptualized by Cheryl Lichtenthal Harding. Data were gathered and processed with statistical treatment with percentage, weighted mean, descriptive rating, analysis of variance and t-test to determine the level of significance using 0.05 critical value. Demographic data showed that the student respondents are on their early adult specifically 71% are 21 years old mostly female and single. Result showed that the readiness to learn of the BSN III students in the classroom is slightly ready; in the skills laboratory is slightly ready; and in the clinical area is moderately ready. Furthermore, it revealed that there is no significant difference in the BSN III students’ readiness to learn the NCM subject in the classroom lecture, skills laboratory and clinical area.The relationship between the standard level of readiness set by the Area Heads and the actual level of readiness of the students in NCM 102 learning settings showed that there is a significant difference between the standard level of readiness set by the area heads and the actual level of readiness of the students in the classroom lecture; there is a significant difference between the standard level of readiness set by the area heads and the actual level of readiness of the students in the skills laboratory lesson; and there is a significant difference between the standard level of readiness set by the area heads and the actual level of readiness of the students in the clinical area. The implication of the study is to propose an instructional program in nursing to improve nursing student’s competencies which may focus on the following measures: 1.) Informing the concerned of the results the study on readiness to learn; 2.) Identify individual strengths and weaknesses; 3.) Plan the instructional program based from the identified areas of strengths and weaknesses such as instructional objectives, learning content, teaching strategies, learning resources, evaluation measures and tools. Whereas in the College of Nursing/educational institution, results of the study suggest that they need to give emphasis on the following: 1.) classroom management, 2.) strengthening the roles of nurse educators, 3.) effective and efficient monitoring of students’ academic performance, 4.) coordination with the guidance center of the institution to facilitate student’s assistance and strengthening of support system.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Pain and symptom management is the most important area of pediatric palliative care, but clinicians often receive little training in this area. Our research evaluated the effectiveness of pain and symptom management training among pediatric professionals. A quasi-experimental pretest-posttest study was used. Fifty-three pediatric nurses and 18 pediatricians participated in this study for a response rate of 80%. Results showed significant main effects of training on confidence levels (p- value < 0.001), and attitude scores (p- value < 0.001) among pediatric clinicians in a variety of areas with no differences in scores between pediatricians and nurses. This suggests that education can effectively increase pediatric clinicians’ confidence in and attitudes toward providing pain and symptom management for children with severe illness. Further training is needed to promote interdisciplinary healthcare team work to improve the effectiveness of pain and symptom management.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

The study reveals that blended learning approach facilitates competency development among student nurses. Knowledge is transferred faster with the use of digitally prepared modules and comprehension is enhanced sine it is an independent self-directed learning package which allows student to study and review content and actual procedure at their most convenient time as often as they deem necessary. Skills are likewise developed with the provision of guided practice sessions with an experienced clinical instructor using a step-by-step procedure checklist. Moreso, attitude of caring is developed in performing fundamental procedures with a classmate or actual patient. The need to promote being gentle, compassionate and provision of privacy were observed as student nurses performed required nursing procedures.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Purpose:  This study was conducted to monitor nursing education programs’ (HEIs) quantitative and qualitative data and to determine its implication in designing a responsive prototype monitoring model.

Methods: Qualitative-descriptive study of two (2) major groups of respondents: 10 or 18.18 percent university administrators; and 45 or 81.82 percent faculty, or a total of 55 participants.            Self-structured survey questionnaire validated by a panel of expert was utilized.

Results: There exist no significant (Z=1.367; cv = 1.645) difference in the assessment of the two groups of respondents (the administration and faculty members).  In the computation of the Z test the highest computed Z is in administration, Z = 1.367; and the lowest is in Laboratory and Cooperating Agencies, with Z = 0.054. The researcher, based on the result of the survey proposed a prototype Monitoring Model for the agency so that a system of monitoring activities can be readily available.

Conclusion: All HEIs adequately comply based on the result of the quantitative and qualitative data. However, compliance failed to attain full level of functionality and interdisciplinary approach in the areas of faculty, facilities and equipment, research and development requirements.  The proposed Prototype Monitoring Model by the researcher adopts the CHEDs monitoring goals and objectives and recommended for the utilization of HEIs administrators as a means to further comply to strategic monitoring requirements of the CHED.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr Masango is currently working as a senior lecturer in the Department of Health Studies at the University of South Africa (UNISA). She has previously worked as a professional nurse at Ngwelezane hospital in KwaZulu Natal Province (1982-1985), as a lecturer and senior lecturer  at the University of Zulu Land (1995- 2007), Provincial coordinator for the University Research Cooperation (2007-2009) and Campus manager at Net Care Education (2009-2010). She is and has been involved in the supervision of post-graduate students (M&D) some of which have completed their theses and dissertations. 

Abstract:

Purpose: To explore and describe the lived experiences of student teachers currently registered for the Bachelor of Curationis (BCUR) studying in an ODL university. The degree comprises nursing education and management and the students had attended the teaching practice workshop, a component of nursing education programme.

Method and design: An explorative, descriptive, interpretative and qualitative design was conducted to explore student teachers experiences of the teaching practice workshop they have attended. Purposive sampling which is based on the belief that the researcher’s knowledge about the population can be used to hand pick sample elements was used. Students who were willing to participate were requested to sign the consent form. Data was collected through written narratives and a Collaiz’s method of data analysis was followed.

Results: The majority of the students indicated that the workshop period of five days is too short compromising face to face learning and makes teaching and learning to take place under duress. They also expressed fear of the unknown and anxiety as they had never taught before. Others felt it was real experience situation, where they practiced peer assessment and had an opportunity of socializing with fellow students.

Conclusions:  Student teachers indicated that the one day orientation done beginning of the year should be extended to five days to facilitate maximum guidance by lecturers and to ensure proper preparation of lesson plans. This should be followed by another five days for the teaching practice workshop. Audio visual teachings and recording was suggested as a form of assessment. Use of latest technology such as power point presentation should be used instead of overhead projectors and posters

Speaker
Biography:

Farida Himat Khan has completed her Mphil in Health Sciences Education from Stellenbosch University South Africa in 2013. Her major subjects were curriculum development and analysis, Assessment Methods, Leadership, Research, Teaching in Primary Health Care and Teaching Methodologies. It involved a great deal of independent research, requiring initiative, self-motivation and a wide range of skills.  She is the principal of Islamabad Nursing College. She worked with International NGOs and Pakistan Nursing Council to strengthen the Examination Systems of nurses.

Abstract:

Aim This study aimed to explore the perceptions of third year nursing students regarding the ethics module at Shifa College of Nursing, Islamabad, Pakistan.

Method Third year nursing students (n=26) completed a retrospective pre/post survey rating their knowledge before and after the ethics module. Focus group discussions (FGDs) addressed the importance of ethics teaching in nursing, the content, teaching and learning strategies of the module as well as whether the application of the concepts learned in the classroom were practiced in the clinical setting.

Results Participants rated their knowledge higher in the post-test (4.00) than the pretest questionnaire (2.26) (p=0.003). The main themes identified during the focus group discussions were: understanding their responsibilities towards the patient; an appreciation of the patient as a human being; applicability of the module to the clinical setting; the role of student nurses in ethical decision making in the clinical setting; and the teaching and learning strategies. The context of the nurse's practice was also identified as being important.

 Conclusion The participants valued the ethics module and its applicability to the clinical setting, but changes in the content of the module and the teaching and learning strategies were suggested. 

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Introduction: Despite of considerable impact of context based learning as an educational method in the field of Evidence Based nursing education, The workshop is still one of the most widely teaching method that are used, particularly in nursing  for promotion of  the knowledge, attitude and Practice in different contexts. Since the Success of Organ Donation Process is Closely Related to the Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Nurses toward Organ Donation Process, Therefore This Study was conducted to compare the Effect of Two Teaching Methods (Workshop & Context Based Learning) on Nurse's Knowledge, Attitude and Practice in Relation to Nurse's Role in Organ Donation Process.

Methods: In this Experimental study, Through Random Assignment, 3 ICU Wards of Gheam Hospital of Mashhad university of medical science devoted to Context based Learning and 6 Wards devoted to Workshop Group. Then through Stratified Random Sampling Allocation Method, Demandable Nurse's That Determine based on Pilot Study were Selected and Intervention Was Done on 60 ICU Nurse's (each group, n=30(. The CBL Training was performed in 3 session, every session length 2 hours and Time Interval between Sessions was 1 week. In workshop group, Intervention was performed in two stages, every stages length 3 hours and between two stages was last 1 week. Both group before and 1 month after intervention complete questionnaire of Assessing nurse's Knowledge, Attitude and Practice in Relation to Nurse's Role in Organ Donation Process. Data Analysis was done by SPSS11.5 software and by using t-test, Paired test, Wilcoxon, Man-whinny and Chi-Square.

Results: Change Score of Knowledge in Context Based Learning was (43/4± 13/1) greater Than Workshop Group (14/3± 4/0) that statistically was Significant (p<0/001). Also in Attitude Change Score in Context Based Learning was (28/7 ± 21/2) greater Than Workshop group (13/1± 8/7) that statistically was Significant (p<0/001). Furthermore in Practice Change Score in Context Based Learning was (73/6± 21/1) greater Than Workshop group (23/3± 6/8) that statistically was Significant (p<0/001).

Conclusion: Based on Results, Context Based Learning Program had more effect in increasing average Level of Knowledge, Attitude and Practice in relation to Nurse’s Role in Organ Donation Process rather than the Workshop Method. It is therefore suggested to utilize Context Based Learning Method for Evidence Based education of Nurse's Role in Organ Donation Process.

  • International Nursing Education
Location: Osaka, Japan

Session Introduction

Ann M. Mitchell

University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, USA

Title: Development of a Transition to Practice Model Based on QSEN Competencies
Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Problem: Many hospitals in the United States as well as Japan, have difficulty orienting and retaining new nurse graduates. Hospitals employing graduates from their own schools of nursing as well as from other schools have been challenged with prolonged periods of orientation time (up to one year) before the new nurse graduate is able to function autonomously. Furthermore, once through orientation, hospitals are again having difficulty keeping these new nurses employed at the hospital, costing the hospital system enormous resources in terms of both money and time. Purpose: Based on a comprehensive assessment of a Japanese hospital system and its associated School of Nursing in Iizuka, Japan, a team of nursing education experts from the U.S. worked with the hospital and its school’s nursing leaders to design a customized, culturally appropriate, Transition to Practice (TTP) model for newly hired registered nurses. Methods: Through a series of focus groups and nominal group techniques involving all levels of nursing (students to the Chief Nursing Officer), the experts designed a model for Transition to Practice based on the Japanese principles of Kaizen (quality improvement) and Wakaba (nurturing the young leaf). Findings: The newly developed Transition to Practice model encompasses an Academic Service Partnership, a Preceptor Academy, and Residency for Practice. It also calls for a school of nursing curriculum redesign to emphasize readiness to practice, particularly in the senior year. QSEN competencies and KSA's serve as the core component for the school of nursing curriculum redesign, preceptor education, and residency infusion.

Speaker
Biography:

Vincent Raphael V. Manarang has completed his BSN and MAN (Major in Nursing Administration) at Centro Escolar University, Manila, Philippines. He is a full-time professor in the same university teaching the subjects: Primary Health Care, General Anatomy 1 & 2, General Physiology, General Pathology and General Microscopic Anatomy and Embryology. He is also a part-time National Review lecturer for both Nursing and Midwifery Licensure Examinations.

Abstract:

In a complex and evolving world of health care environment today, nurse educators are being challenged to prepare the Millenial students for professional practice in nursing through active learning. Assessing Self-directed Learning Readiness (SDLR) is an important factor in promoting active learning and enhancing academic performance of nursing students. Moreover, considering learning styles is also essential in helping students understand their learning needs.

This descriptive-correlational study aimed to assess the level of readiness of student nurses for self-directed learning, their learning styles and the relationship of these two factors. The Autonomous Learner Index of Abu-Moghli et al (2005) assessed the level of readiness in self-directed learning and the Learning Style Inventory of Kolb (2005) assessed their learning styles. Total population sampling was utilized covering 103 regular nursing students of Centro Escolar University for First semester of school year 2016-2017.

Findings of the study revealed that most of the nursing students were independent learners (52%), there were no dependent learners but there are several respondents who were uncertain (48%). Moreover, all the types of learning styles were present showing the variation in learning styles of nursing students but mostly prefer the Convergent learning style. The study concluded that there is no relationship between the variables: demographic profile, level of readiness for self-directed learning and learning style. However, the scores of convergent learning style was higher than that of divergent in their readiness in self-directed learning readiness, as well as those with convergent learning styles compared to those with accommodative learning styles.

Elaine Jean UAYAN

University of the East Ramon Magsaysay Memorial Medical Center, Inc., Philippines

Title: Comparison of self-perceived cultural competencies among different levels of student nurses
Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Purpose:  This study aims to compare the self-perceived cultural competencies of different levels of  student nurses according to knowledge, skills and attitude and recommend ways to further improve the cultural competency development in undergraduate course.

Methods: Descriptive comparative design was used to identify, analyze, and explain the differences in the cultural competency in the different year levels of the student nurses.  A total of 207 students participated in the study. The Clinical Cultural Competency Questionnaire of Dr. Robert Like was used to gather needed data.  Descriptive statistics were used to analyze demographic profile, ANOVA was used to analyze to determine differences  among the four year levels and Chi-square  was used to analyze confounding variables that are nominal in nature. The latest SPSS version was used to analyze demographic data.

Results:    The   results   revealed   that   students   were   moderately   culturally   competent   in   terms   of knowledge (3.2) and skills (3.4). But, highly culturally competent with regards to their attitude (3.6) towards providing care to culturally diverse population. Also, students were able to carry out complex activities in a culturally sensitive manner and become more experienced with cross-cultural situations as they move to the next year level. There is no significant difference (0.14; 0.52) between the level of cultural competencies among students in all levels with regards to knowledge and skills; but there is a significant difference (3.6) in their level of cultural competencies in terms of attitude

Conclusion:. The study suggest the importance of enhancing cultural competency  is important in the undergraduate level and opportunities for to practice cultural skills is needed for them to provide relevant care to diverse clients.