Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 19th Global Nursing Education Conference
(10Plenary Forums - 1Event)
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Kimberly F Volpe

NYU Langone Medical Center, USA

Keynote: Seminar for emerging nurse leaders

Time : 09:00-09:30

Global Nursing Education 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Kimberly F Volpe  photo
Biography:

Kimberly F Volpe presently works at NYU Langone’s Hospital for Joint Diseases as the Director of Nursing. She is responsible for managing and planning the nursing activities in the Orthopedic Acute Care Service. Her primary responsibility is to lead the staff in the execution of outcome based practice, ensuring high quality nursing care. She is graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Montclair State University, a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from Ramapo College/UMDNJ and a Master of Science from New York University College of Nursing. Most recently, she has completed her Doctorate of Nursing Practice at Villanova University. Additionally, she holds advanced certification in nursing administration and is a member of the American College of Healthcare Executives and New York Organization of Nurse Executives and Leaders.

Abstract:

Historically, nurse leaders are frequently selected for leadership positions based on their clinical expertise, rather than their ability to lead. The role of the Assistant Nurse Manager is comprised of two distinct responsibilities: Management and leadership. Participation in leadership development programs is a proven strategy to provide novice nurse leaders an opportunity to acquire new competencies. The purpose of this project was to develop and implement a leadership seminar for assistant nurse managers at New York University Langone Medical Center’s Hospital for Joint Diseases (NYULMC-HJD). This project addresses curriculum development, implementation and evaluation for the educational seminar designed to enhance the assistant nurse manager’s knowledge of leadership theories and management skills. A seminar for emerging nurse leaders was a one-day seminar incorporating three core concepts: Leadership theories, organizational goals and relational work. The project details, the process of conducting an assessment, implementation and evaluation of large scale project to increase knowledge acquisition of assistant nurse managers. Concluding the project, a pre/post data analysis was performed. The IBM SPSS version 24 software was used to tabulate the data. The Mann Whitney Test was used to evaluate level of significance. Whereas, the research showed an increase in knowledge from pretest to post-test, it was not significant (p>0.05). Limitations to the data included a small participant sample size and the knowledge test was limited to ten questions. The implications for leadership practice demonstrate that development programs are a key strategy for preparing novice leaders. Nurse leaders are essential to meet an organization’s goals. Novice leaders require continuous education as the transition from the clinical practice to the leadership practice. It is imperative that nurse leadership development programs are linked to organizational goals including creating a caring practice environment and improved patient care outcomes. 

Keynote Forum

Mercy Popoola

American University of Health Sciences, USA

Keynote: Paradigmatic shift: The holistic praxis educational phenomenon

Time : 9:30-10:00

Global Nursing Education 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mercy Popoola photo
Biography:

Mercy Popoola is currently the Dean of Nursing and has been in leadership role for over 25 years. She has also been an Educator (traditional and online) and Clinician for over 30 years. Her PhD in Nursing is from the University of Colorado Health Science Center Denver CO with a Master’s in Nursing Education, her career as a critical care, telemetry, obstetric, community, and holistic nurse has spanned over 30 years of Nursing in the United States and abroad. Her professional  experience include teaching for undergraduate and graduate nursing programs, in MBA programs, and in other health care programs; and working with various healthcare and HMO companies. Her research interest centers on the management of chronic health problems from a holistic and caring praxis perspective. She is a recipient of several grants and teaching-scholarship academic awards; author of four books, 25 academic journal publications, more than 50 professional presentations and workshops. She has developed over 10 academic and continued education programs and has been involved in the development and implementation of health care policy statements and nursing certifications program. As a Health Care Consultant, she has consulted with several local, national, and international organizations. She once served as a Consultant for the Department of Area Aging Agency and various international schools of nursing.  

Abstract:

Purpose: Evolution and reconceptualization of technology in the society for the last 30 years has provided an opportunity for a paradigmatic shift in healthcare education, practice and the focus on the concept of praxis. Twenty years ago, there was no nursing textbook, discussing the concept of praxis. The explosion of the use of technology has provided support for and the revisiting of the concept of praxis, which began with Florence Nightingale. Praxis is a holistic critical thinking process that can be an innovative and transcendent model of nursing education or practice and it is grounded in the philosophy of holism. The purpose of this presentation is to provide expert innovative approaches to use the concept of praxis in embracing modern technology in nursing education and practice using a myriad of grand and middle range nursing and non-nursing theories as exemplary experts. This presentation will also explain the need for the dramatic paradigmatic shift for the use of praxis in nursing education and practice.
 
Objectives: After the end of this presentation or workshop, the participants will be able to: 1. Address the history of praxis in nursing as a critical thinking and holistic phenomenon, 2. Describe the need for a paradigmatic shift from the concept of holism to holistic praxis, 3. Understand the concept of praxis from a holistic, critical thinking, and technological approaches, 4. Examine innovation praxis models to promote the use of technology in the 21st century for nursing education and practice, 5. Develop transformative and innovative strategies for including the concept of holism in praxis opportunities for education and practice, 6. Use expert and praxis theories as exemplary guidelines to designed opportunities for nursing educators and leaders, 7. Discuss strategies designed to enhance mindful use of technology to promote positive healthcare outcomes and for improving practice and education, 8. Address the various Nightingale praxis contribution to nursing as a profession and 9. Explore ways to reshape nursing practice and education for the role of holistic nurses in the 21st century. 

Global Nursing Education 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Keratiloe N Gwebu photo
Biography:

Keratiloe N Gwebu is the Dean of the School of Health Sciences at Rusangu University in Zambia, Africa. She did her Diploma in Nursing and a certification in Midwifery in Zimbabwe. She did her Undergraduate and Graduate Nursing Education in USA. She has taught for 18 years in US based universities and colleges.

Abstract:

Problem of Statement: The challenges faced by the nursing profession require effective leadership skills. There is a gap between nursing education and practice. Leadership education must be an integral component of the nursing curriculum for nurses to lead the health care industry effectively. However, for most nursing schools, leadership is taught as a single course in the senior year. The concern is whether this one semester course improves students leadership skills needed for excellent performance in practice.

Purpose of Study: To determine the impact of a three-hour-credit semester course in leadership and management, on senior student nurses’ self-perceived transformational leadership skills?

Method and Theoretical Orientation: The study assessedself-reported transformational leadership skills of student nurses enrolled in a three-hour-credit course in leadership and management using the student version of Kouzes and Posner's Transformational Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI) instrument based on Kouzes and Posner's leadership model, as outlined in given figure  

Findings: The results were mixed implying that the course may not have covered certain aspects of the Kouzes and Posner Transformational Leadership Practices Model.

Conclusion & Significance: The leadership and management course positively impacted the transformational leadership skills of the students how are it moderately demonstrating some deficiencies in the course.

Recommendations: Each nursing program should implement a prospective study to monitor the progress in the inculcation of transformational leadership skills at every level with final assessment in the senior year to ensure that tenets of all the five practices of Kouzes and Posner are covered adequately in the curriculum at every level.

  • International Nursing Education | Nursing Education Types | Nurse Practitioners Perspectives| Public Health Nursing
Location: Hampton Inn Tropicana and Event Center
Speaker

Chair

Keratiloe N Gwebu

Rusangu University, Zambia

Speaker

Co-Chair

Jill M Moore

Indiana State University, USA

Session Introduction

Angie Brindowski

Carroll University, USA

Title: Academic Success Program In Nursing: Increasing Diversity in the Nursing Workforce

Time : 10:50-11:40

Speaker
Biography:

Angie Brindowski has her expertise in nursing program development, evaluation, and nursing student retention. Her retention program strategies and programming are grounded in an ecological framework that supports students financially, socially, and environmentally to succeed in nursing school and practice in underserved areas in the U.S. The approach utilizes multiple strategies and programs to support students across the University.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem:  In the 2016 American Association of Colleges of Nursing graduation report from 851 institutions across the United States (US) the race and ethnicity of graduates is 72% White, 9% Hispanic, and 8% Black. The US census report highlights the race/ethnicity gap in the nursing workforce; the population is 73% White, 13% Black, and 17% Hispanic. To achieve the goal of high quality, safe, and accessible care the US needs a nursing workforce that reflects the cultural values of the community. The Academic Success Program In Nursing (ASPIN) is a descriptive study whose aim is to recruit, retain, and graduate students from minority backgrounds and/or are disadvantaged to earn a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree. The nature of the ASPIN program is to work with school partners and admitted nursing students offering multilevel programs to retain and graduate a diverse population. Program implementation began on July 1, 2014 with a student group of 17 Hispanic (68%), 2 Black (8%), and 6 White students ((24%). The program retention rate is 84% with 3 Hispanic, 1 Black, and 1 White student who did not continue. The ASPIN program employs the social determinants of health and the ecological framework to focus on supporting students economically, socially, and educationally. Findings: The students in this study who took advantage of academic support, faculty advising, as well as scholarship awards were successful in continuing in the nursing program. However, without adding additional cost and testing ACT reading and math scores should also be utilized to build individual student success programs.  Conclusion and Significance: Hispanic, African American, and White students need financial support, tutoring, and peer group support to succeed. Recommendation:  In addition, faculty advisors should use ACT entrance exam scores to customize an individualized academic success plan.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Brenda Query has been a registered nurse for 20 years and nursing faculty for 14 years; her PhD in Nursing is from the University of Alberta in Canada. Her main areas of interest are pediatrics, critical care, research, pharmacology, and hemodialysis. Focused areas of research are the health and health promoting behaviors of urban and rural caregivers of children with disabilities.  

Abstract:

Engagement in health promoting behaviors has been shown to improve the health of individuals. However, there is a difference in both the health status and the health-promoting behaviors of urban and rural Canadians. These differences and possible reasons as to why these differences exist will be briefly discussed. While individuals are responsible for the decisions that they make regarding their health promoting behaviors, other factors have the potential to influence these behaviors; this viewpoint is supported by proponents of social ecology models. The authors of these models contend that other factors, such as family, social, organizational, environmental, and policy factors can also acts as facilitators and barriers to health promoting behaviors. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss the unique and multi-faceted facilitators and barriers to health promoting behaviors experienced by individuals living in rural communities in Canada. Nursing implications regarding the assessment of these rural Canadians will be explored. Subsequent focuses for the health teaching of patients/clients who live in and/or who are being discharged to rural communities in Canada will then be presented

Speaker
Biography:

Ana Bandin received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of Miami in 2006. She’s been a pediatric nurse in the respiratory unit for more than 10 years. Her expertise, passion for teaching, innovation and evidence based practice, led her to her current role of clinical educator for her unit. She’s a Master in Nursing Education candidate this summer. She serves as the facilitator for the nursing research and evidence based practice council at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital. She was presented the certificate of Excellence for an Evidence-based practice Poster from the Society of Pediatric Nurses in April 2016 and awarded Scholar of the Year for her organization in Nurses’ week 2016. Ana strives for quality and safe care through best practices while driving service excellence and patient satisfaction in her unit and organization.

Sofia de la Camara received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of Miami in 2015. She currently serves as the co-chair for the evidence based practice council at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital in Miami, Fl. Her passion in nursing research and evidence based practice has propelled her to initiate projects to improve patient satisfaction and outcomes. Her time spent living and volunteering abroad in South America sparked special interest in the incorporation and practice of culturally sensitive nursing. 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Healthcare Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) surveys collect national data and report patient/caregivers perspective on quality and service of their hospital experience. The question on possible side effects of medications was the focus of this unit. Scores for 1st quarter, 2016 were inconsistent and reached an all-time low.

 

Aim: The purpose of this quality improvement initiative was to standardize the educational approach nurses took when teaching patients/caregivers about medication side effects, in turn, improving scores.

 

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Placing a visual magnetic M at the patient’s communication board, cues the teach-back process. Retraining staff on previous M in the box initiative was priority. In collaboration with teach-back, a bilingual double-sided educational leaflet was created for the most used medications on this unit. These leaflets were sensitive to learning barriers such as low health literacy and language. The focus was on partnering with patient/caregiver to assist them in understanding key information and engage them in the teach-back process.

 

Findings: Evaluation of quarterly HCAHPS scores showed increase in patient satisfaction post implementation of the multi-method initiative. The greatest progress occurred from 1st to 2nd quarter, with scores improving from 51.6% to 71.3%, respectively and sustainability shown in the 3rd and 4th quarter at 72.9% and 73.2%.

 

Conclusion & Significance: Partnering with patients/caregivers using the teach-back method and key educational material, proved to be an effective process assisting patients understand important medication information while having a positive effect on consumer satisfaction, therefore, resulting in increased HCAHPS scores outcome. 

Speaker
Biography:

Jill Moore is an expert in nursing in the academic environment where she is the Director of the Doctor of nursing practice and nursing education programs. She is devoted to student success and interested in policy that affects the learning environment. Prior to transitioning to nurse education she has practiced in the acute care environment working within teams of multigenerational healthcare workers.

Abstract:

Patient acuity in hospital settings continues to increase, and there is greater emphasis on patient outcomes. The current nursing workforce is comprised of four distinct generational cohorts that include veterans, baby boomers, millennials, and generation Xers. Each group has unique characteristics that add complexity to the workforce and this can add challenges in providing optimal patient care. Team building is one strategy to increase mutual understanding, communication, and respect, and thus potentially improve patient outcomes. In this article, we first briefly define generational cohorts by characteristics, and discuss differing expectations for work/life balance and potential negative outcomes. Our discussion offers team building strategies for positive outcomes, a case scenario, and concludes with resources for team building and organizational opportunities.

Kathy A. Baule

Indiana University Ball Memorial Hospital, USA

Title: Improving satisfaction among established patients in a midwestern pain clinic

Time : 13:40-14:05

Speaker
Biography:

Kathy Baule is an Advanced Practice Nurse who has worked for over 20 years in the area of Critical Care, Neurosurgery and Pain Management. She has presented at American Association of Neuroscience Nursing, Midwestern Pain Society Nursing as well as Midwest Nursing Research Society.  Her special interest in patient satisfaction was the drive to recently investigate patient satisfaction in among established patients in a Midwestern Pain clinic. After receiving her Doctorate in Nursing Practice from the University of Illinois at Chicago, she is practices at Indiana University Ball Memorial Hospital as an APN in Trauma and Neurosurgery.

Abstract:

Background: A problem in many health care practices is deciding the appropriate appointment length for new and established patients. Patients become frustrated when there is inadequate time to have their needs met, yet when a patient's clinic time is spontaneously lengthened; the provider gets behind in schedule, causing delays and greater frustration for others.

Aim: The aims of this evidence based project were to determine whether implementation of a flexible appointment system would improve the current scheduling process in a pain clinic by allowing complex patients the opportunity to schedule a longer clinic appointment and would improve patient satisfaction.

Design: This evidence-based practice innovation followed a program evaluation process using a descriptive, existing survey completed by clinic staff and patients.

Setting: A Midwestern pain clinic caring for patients with acute and chronic pain diagnoses.

Participants: A convenience sample of 120 patients were surveyed before and after the process change. Thirteen staff members completed the survey on SurveyMonkey pre and post procedural change at the same intervals the patients were surveyed.

Results: Patients were more satisfied with the time that they spent in the exam room and the waiting room. The process change improved communication with staff and patients and provided an opportunity to discuss their concerns and health changes prior to their scheduled appointment.

Conclusion: Allowing an option for flexible scheduling in appointment lengths provided an opportunity to meet patient needs, offer improved service, and improve patient-provider communication.

Recommendations: It may be beneficial to assess the level of patient satisfaction with those patients who chose to extend their appointments and compare the level of satisfaction with those patients who did not lengthen their appointments and to evaluate the amount of “no-show” appointments with those who have extended their appointment.  Implementing a standardized script for the schedulers may help with appropriate patient appointment lengths and decrease the number of patients’ appointments that were lengthened without patients’ knowledge.

Speaker
Biography:

Sherry L Donaworth is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing at the University of Cincinnati, College of Nursing. She is board certified as an Adult-Acute Care Nurse Practitioner and a Family Nurse Practitioner. Her extensive clinical practice experience has included critical care, cardiology, geriatrics as well as primary care. As a Lead Faculty for advanced pharmacology and clinical management of adult health problems, she has utilized the “Flipped Classroom” and advanced technology in teaching, for both onsite and distance learners. She served as a Content Expert on an ANE HRSA Grant for interactive case studies for distance learning students. 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Engagement of students and development of critical-thinking skills are always a challenge for advanced practice nursing faculty. Emphasis in the classroom on active learning and application of complex concepts, rather than memorization of content, is an approach endorsed in the educational literature. How can technology be leveraged to allow use of valuable classroom time for active learning strategies without sacrificing delivery of essential didactic content?  

Strategy/Intervention: An interprofessional team that included clinical faculty, instructional designers and information technologists collaborated to solve the dilemma of adding active learning strategies while providing methods for conveyance of important didactic knowledge. The “Flipped Classroom” was introduced into selected graduate nurse practitioner courses in a large, urban college of nursing. Faculty served as content experts and developed real-world scenarios and case studies to facilitate meaningful student interactions during classroom time. Weekly quizzes, with unlimited attempts to score 100%, were employed to reinforce learning. The expertise of instructional designers and information technologists was utilized to leverage technology to deliver crucial content. Lectures were chunked into 15-25 minute segments and videos were presented in formats that students could download to various platforms such as smart phones, tablets and iPads. Students met in the classroom every other week for active learning sessions.

Findings: The majority of student feedback was positive regarding the active learning case studies and the weekly quizzes. A small number of students objected to the time commitment of listening to lecture and completing weekly quizzes prior to classroom time. Many students reported being able to process didactic content at their own pace and the ability to replay and review complex concepts as a positive result of the “Flipped Classroom”.

Speaker
Biography:

Lisa Green completed her MSN in 2008 from Cardinal Stritch University in Milwaukee, WI and undergraduate BSN from Viterbo University in LaCrosse, WI in 2000.  She is the senior level leader and coordinates precepted clinical placements.  Lisa teaches Pathophysiology, Professional Practice Preparation, and Medical-Surgical clinical.  She has an interest in nursing simulation research and interprofessional education.  

Abstract:

Purpose: Interprofessional education (IPE) has a goal to help improve the patient experience, improve health, and reduce the cost of health care. Therefore, building IPE into simulations allows students from different disciplines to learn more about roles and responsibilities, values/ethics, teamwork, and communication. In nursing curricula, it is difficult to involve students in interprofessional activity in the clinical setting, so a learning activity was implemented to give nursing students the opportunity to communicate with another profession.

Methodology: A quasi-experimental pretest/post-test design was conducted to explore the effects of an interprofessional simulation experience on nursing students’ attitudes, knowledge, and communication skills. Surveys were administered to all participants on week prior to the interprofessional simulation experience and again after the completion of the simulation experience and debriefing. The surveys included Student Satisfaction and Self-Confidence in Learning (SS&SCL) and the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS). Paired T-tests were used to analyse survey results.

Findings: Results indicated that nursing students demonstrated significant differences when comparing pretests to post-tests in both surveys. The SS & SCL indicated a significant increase in attitudes about the instruction student received following the simulation activity. The RIPLS survey had significantly higher scores for the post-tests in areas concerning shared learning with other health care students which increased student’s understanding of clinical problems and made them think more positively about other professionals. Ultimately the students indicated that this IPE experience would benefit patients if health-care students worked together to solve patient problems.

Conclusion: The use of collaborative IPE within nursing curricula will aide students in developing an understanding of the roles, responsibilities, values/ethics, teamwork, and effective communication with should be continued to aid in understanding of other professions. Nursing students’ perceptions of IPE significantly improved following participation in an interprofessional simulation experience.

Speaker
Biography:

Prof. Akinsola is a public health specialist and obtained his first degree and Ph.D. at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria; and Master’s degree at the University of Manchester, England. He has worked in different parts of Africa where he served in different capacities.  Between 2009 and 2015, Prof. Akinsola was the Head of the Dept. of Public Health at the University of Venda where he has been working since 2007. He retired in May 2015 and he is currently a Professor Emeritus in Public Health at the University of Venda.

Abstract:

The purpose of the study was to assess the self-perceived impact of work life on nurses caring for people living with HIV/AIDS in a municipality in South Africa. The study adopted a cross-sectional design and the target population was the nurses caring for people living with HIV/AIDS at the hospitals in Thulamela municipality, South Africa. A sample of 200 nurses was taken randomly from the 4 hospitals and wards where HIV/AIDS patients are admitted in the municipality. A Likert Scale type of questionnaire was used as the instrument for data collection. The questionnaire was self-administered. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences software (SPSS) version 20.0 was used for data analysis. Ethical clearance certificate to conduct this study was issued by the University of Venda Research Ethical Committee. The result showed that the general feeling of a sizeable proportion of the respondents was that they suffered from signs of psychological problems due to their caring role and they also expressed feelings of depression and burnout.

Darla K. Topley

University of Virginia Health System, USA

Title: Let’s Move It: Progressive mobility in the cardiac intensive and acute care environment

Time : 15:20-15:45

Speaker
Biography:

As a retired military nurse, she has travelled the world being involved with many types of health care systems.  Presently she is  at an academic health care system that is patient centered involved in improving the health care. Her nursing expertise is in critical care nursing where she believe patient mobility can improve patient outcomes and standard work via a multidisciplinary team approach. Currently she is an  CardiacNurseSpecialist in a cardiac thoracic ICU. She has published articles, research and presented at conferences on patient mobility.

Abstract:

A nurse-driven progressive mobility protocol was developed and implemented in a thoracic cardiovascular intensive care, coronary intensive care and thoracic cardiovascular acute care unit evaluating the impact on ventilator associated pneumonia, ventilator days, pressure ulcers, venous thromboembolism, discharge placement, length of stay and the number of patient falls.

A multidisciplinary team approach was used to develop progressive mobility guidelines, protocol, education and interventions for 3 different patient care units.  Several techniques were used to educate unit staff and implement the protocol.  In-services, demos and hands on methods were used for education.  In addition, mobility champions, laminated charts, incentives and a physician champion were approaches used for implementation. Research on immobility has found muscle weakness and wasting to be the most prominent complications responsible for disability in patients evaluated after discharge. Up to 60% of discharged critically ill patients may have long-term complications inhibiting them from complete functional recovery.   In fact, critically ill patients who are on strict bed-rest have a decline of 1% to 1.5% per day and up to 50% of total muscle mass in 2 weeks. Prolonged immobilization of patients in intensive care contributes to the risk of ventilator associated pneumonia; weaknesses associated with immobility have been associated with deep vein thrombosis, falls, and pressure ulcers. Studies have been published demonstrating that early mobilization contributes to an improvement in patients’ quality of life, endurance, and facilitated early weaning from the ventilator. Exercising patients may be challenging, but with a dedicated interprofessional team and protocols, early mobility has been found to be safe.

Speaker
Biography:

Ana Bandin received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of Miami in 2006. She’s been a pediatric nurse in the respiratory unit for more than 10 years. Her expertise, passion for teaching, innovation and evidence based practice, led her to her current role of clinical educator for her unit. She’s a Master in Nursing Education candidate this summer. She serves as the facilitator for the nursing research and evidence based practice council at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital. She was presented the certificate of Excellence for an Evidence-based practice Poster from the Society of Pediatric Nurses in April 2016 and awarded Scholar of the Year for her organization in Nurses’ week 2016. Ana strives for quality and safe care through best practices while driving service excellence and patient satisfaction in her unit and organization. 

Jenna Klareich has been practicing as a pediatric nurse for 8 years. She obtained masters in nursing education from the University of Central Florida. While practicing as a bedside nurse, she acquired a certification in pediatric nursing. She then became an assistant nurse manager for a medical surgical pediatric unit and an orthopedic/neurology pediatric unit. Along with working at the bedside and in management, she also worked part time as an adjunct instructor at a local nursing college educating nursing students in the skills lab and taking them to clinical sites. Currently, I practice as a clinical specialist/educator on a medical pediatric unit. The specialties on the unit include, but are not limited to, gastroenterology, endocrinology, nephrology, and adolescent medicine. Educating patients, families, and staff about current evidence based practices is a strong passion of mine so everyone can benefit from high quality care.

 

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Achieving effective nursing education lies in addressing everyone’s learning needs while having students partake in their learning. The literature supports, skills fairs as significant way of validating competencies. Skills fairs are a way to reinforce practice guidelines and add new knowledge. The clinical educator team established the need to develop competency-based learning through a skill fair. The purpose of this skill fair was to increase the knowledge-base of nurses with varied experiences across the point of care, through a nonconventional learning opportunity, which standardized care delivery in medical surgical units.

Methodology & Theoretical Orientation: Skills chosen for the fair were based on a needs- assessment evaluation and common medical surgical skills. The 12 skills stations introduced were: Blood administration, quality indicators, wound care, intravenous access care, sepsis screening, chest tube care, tracheostomy care, pain management, infection prevention, medication administration, feeding tube care, regulatory agency, and code cart review. Pretests and post-tests were administered to all attendees. A passport was provided as a roadmap ensuring attendance at each skill stations. Upon completion, the completed passport entered a raffle. Visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learning styles were captured. Vendors were available to inform attendees about professional development opportunities. Feedback by way of evaluations, helped to clarify unclear points and share experiences.

Findings: From 200 attendees, pretest average was 74%. Post-test average was 90% showing knowledge retention. Three post-tests have showed monthly increase of knowledge retention at 89%, 90% and 92%. Pre-event self-knowledge increased from 78% to 94%. Satisfaction showed an average of 4.1 on a 1-5 scale.

Conclusion & Significance: Competency-based learning with skills fairs, benefits nursing practice and standardizes care. Findings demonstrated knowledge retention and event satisfaction. Competency-based learning with skills fairs enhances care delivery by improving skill sets for a more competent nurse in today’s evolving healthcare system.

Salma Alshammari

Indiana University of Pennsylvania, USA

Title: Effectiveness of implementing shared governance on turnover rates

Time : 16:30-16:55

Speaker
Biography:

Salma Alshammari received Bachelor’s degree in Nursing Sciences from University of Hail in Saudi Arabia, and Master’s degree in Nursing Administration from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, USA. She is currently working as Teaching Assistant/Clinical Instructor at Shaqra University, College of Applied Medical Sciences. Her teaching interests include supervising students in the clinical settings in Nursing Administration Course and Community Health Nursing Course. Her role is helping nursing students in identifying their learning needs, strengths and limitations, and they select learning opportunities that will improve their knowledge. Her primary research interests are in the field of decreasing turnover rates among nursing staff through improving their job satisfaction. In her free time, she works as a Volunteer in a nursing home, Indiana PA, and a member in Toastmaster International Club.

Abstract:

One of the most common issues affecting the performance and productivity of healthcare facilities is nursing staff turnover. High rates of nursing staff turnover in healthcare facilities is a recent concern that may have negative impacts on nursing staff, patients, and healthcare organizations. Many of factors lead to increase nursing turnover rates such as nurses’ dissatisfaction, lack of engagement, and poor communication in the workplace. Although many solutions for reducing turnover rate are utilized, the percentages of turnover rates among nursing staff are still a major issue. Since many members of nursing staff cannot become involved in any decision making processes or share their ideas in healthcare sectors, nurses leave their jobs in order to find another workplace where the environment and job satisfaction are better. As a result, implementing of shared-governance principles is an effective strategy that has been recommended by various researchers for enhancing nursing satisfaction and retention rates. The aim of this presentation is to discuss the effectiveness of implementing shared-governance principles on turnover rates. Therefore, implementing of shared governance can provide nurses with an opportunity for involving into organizational decisions that influence the outcomes of quality health care.

Speaker
Biography:

Lin Tao is working in School of Nursing, West China Hospital, Sichuan University. Her main research direction is Community Care. She has taken part in 2 international nursing conferences, which were held in Singapore and Thailand.

Abstract:

Background: The cost of curing chronic diseases has been the present growth trend. And, improving the health promotion and healthcare management may have achieved significant results in terms of population health maintenance. How to make the community health nurses' role full play and establish a comprehensive education development plan had been the concern of the Chinese Government.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate community health nurses' role, work contents, and explore the reasonable teaching methods by knowing nurses’ learning needs.

Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional design using self-answered questionnaires comprising demographic questions and three scales measuring actual role, work content and teaching needs scale was used.

Results: 1,015 community health nurses in 56 CHS centers were cluster sampled. Findings showed that the community nurses mainly undertook the roles of health educator (94.0%), health care giver (84.9%), collaborator and coordinator (78.5%), observer (73.9%), manager and organizer (52.3%), but seldom undertook advocate role (48.4%), leadership role (27.7%) and research role (32.3%). And, there were five most important work contents: Health education (84.4%), providing care for patient directly (71.4%), community-based prevention (70.1%), chronic disease management (69.6%) and elderly healthcare (66.5%). This presents a problem for community nursing education: lacking of related ability such as advocating for residents, leadership skills and scientific research skills are perceived as the greatest need. Nurses preceptors also need to improve teaching related to maternal healthcare, child healthcare, mental rehabilitation, family health nursing and hospice care.

Conclusions: For community health nurses in China to function perfect, making best use of interactive teaching methodologies and encouraging nurses in community based research projects helped a lot to improve individual quality and ability. Meanwhile, encourage nurses in family health survey and learn to do community diagnosis contributed to take good care of vulnerable groups.

Speaker
Biography:

Xiaoxia Chang is a Graduate student who has studied in Sichuan University and is registered in West China Hospital. She has published 2 papers in core journals in China. Her major is Clinical Nursing and she is devoted to improve and/or maintain the health behaviors of patients.

Abstract:

Background: Daily management of diabetes is the prerequisite to promote blood glucose and quality of life in diabetic patients, especially in patients with insulin therapy. The self-management behaviors in diabetic patients with initial basal insulin therapy have attracted little attention in the literature.

Objective: To investigate the blood glucose levels and self-management behaviors in diabetic patients with initial basal insulin therapy. And analyze the effect of the Compliance Program for Basal Insulin Usage Standardization on self-management behaviors of diabetic patients.

Methods: A convenient sample of 257 outpatients with initial basal insulin therapy hospitalized in a major hospital during February 2016 to October and August 2016 participated in the study on a voluntary basis. Initial diabetes education was conducted to participants by nursing specialists. Patients’ demographic information and the result of glycosylated hemoglobin were collected at initiate. Short message and telephone follow-up were conducted regularly. The items of summary of diabetes self-care activities (SDSCA) were gathered by questionnaires at initiate and after three months.

Results: The blood glucose control conditions were poor among diabetic patients starting basal insulin therapy, with 24 patients (9.3%) meet the goal of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c<7%). And the total SDSCA score was about (26.64±14.71) at initiate, in which 64 patients (24.9%) performed well. The total score of self-management behaviors was significantly improved after three months intervention with score of (50.61±8.48) and 192 patients (74.7%) performed well. All dimensions of self-management behaviors was significantly different (P<0.01).

Conclusion: The blood glucose levels and self-management behaviors in diabetic patients with initial basal insulin therapy are not optimistic. And the compliance program for basal insulin usage standardization contributes to improve diabetes self-care activities.