Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 19th Global Nursing Education Conference
(10Plenary Forums - 1Event)
Las Vegas, Nevada, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Audrey E. Nelson

UNMC College of Nursing, USA

Keynote: Methods Used to Facilitate Nursing Students’ Critical Thinking

Time : 09:20-09:50

Global Nursing Education 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Audrey E. Nelson photo
Biography:

Audrey E. Nelson has expertise in teaching and promotion of students’ critical thinking development. She has worked with student for more than 20 years to help the students be successful on course exams and NCLEX licensure exams. She developed an independent technology course for promote study skills, time management, and test taking strategies. She was inducted into the first cohort of the UNMC Interprofessional Education Academy in 2016

Abstract:

Statement of Problem:  Nursing students must learn how to critically think. Nursing’s CT definition evolved from the 1990 CT consensus statement developed by experts from education, social sciences, physical sciences, and philosophy disciplines. The critical thinking in nursing consensus statement (CTNCS) consists of two categories: habits of the mind and cognitive skills. The behavior dimensions in habits of the mind (HM) are perseverance, open-mindedness, flexibility, confidence, creativity, inquisitiveness, reflection, intellectual integrity, intuition, and contextual perspective. Cognitive skills (CS) dimensions are information seeking, discriminating, analyzing, transforming knowledge, predicting, applying standards, and logical reasoning. Through active learning students develop a knowledge base examine relationships between concepts and make patient-centered health care decisions. Purpose: describe educational approaches faculty can use to facilitate students’ CT development with application of CTNCS. Methodology and Theoretical Orientation: education pedagogy and adult learning. Findings: Six course areas where faculty maximize students’ CT in nursing with application of CTNCS include: 1. written learner-centered course and lesson objectives 2. select essential reading assignments, 3. provision of lesson slides before class, 4. course delivery methods of blended-learning method or flipped-classroom approach, 5. learning activities of in-class quizzes, case study discussion or team-based learning groups, and simulation, and 6. application of CT knowledge on examinations. All CS dimensions are applicable in each of the six areas while HM dimensions vary with the area where students are expected to use critical thinking. Conclusion: Faculty are responsible for creating a learning environment that encourages students’ CT development. Nursing educators need to develop CT assessment tools in nursing based on the 17 dimensions to verify best practice evidence of CT development.

Keynote Forum

Mary P. Bourke

Indiana University Kokomo, USA

Keynote: Guide to Teaching in the Concept Based Environment

Time : 09:50-10:20

Global Nursing Education 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mary P. Bourke photo
Biography:

Mary Bourke is an expert in Concept Based Curriculum and Concept Based Clinical Curriculum. She is Assistant Dean of graduate programs and teaches Curriculum in nursing, teaching with Technology, Informatics, Measurement, and Data Analysis in the MSN program.

Abstract:

Statement of the problem: Globally, nursing students are frustrated

because of the amount of reading, memorization, failures, and content processing required in traditional nursing curriculum. A growing body of literature suggest that management of curricular content is one of the key challenges in nursing education. The body of knowledge and skills required for nursing practice today has dramatically changed in the last thirty years, but the teaching methodology and curriculum has not.

 

The result has been coined “Content Saturation’’. A contributing factor includes Knowledge and skills necessary for practice today has grown exponentially due to technology, advances in medicine, and changes in practice. Another contributing factor is a teacher-centered pedagogy, which has been the traditional format in nursing education. This type of pedagogy reinforces that content not covered, students will not learn. The enormity of nursing Content that exists today makes this impossible, thus faculty fail. The solution is a Conceptual pedagogy that emphasizes concepts across contexts, the life span, and the health-illness continuum.

 

Concepts provide the organizational framework and structure for the curriculum and courses. Teaching becomes student centered using instructional strategies focused on conceptual learning. However, after planning and implementation, leadership does not know how to help faculty teach in a concept-based curriculum. The reason a concept based curriculum has difficulty is because faculty do not understand student centered pedagogy and how to teach concepts at an introductory, application and mastery level in layers of complexity across the curriculum. The purpose of this presentation is to introduce a “Guide to Teaching in a Concept Based Curriculum”.

Keynote Forum

Althea Mighten

NYU Langone’s Hospital for Joint Diseases, USA

Keynote: Leadership Structures to empower professional development

Time : 10:40-11:10

Global Nursing Education 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Althea Mighten  photo
Biography:

Althea Mighten holds a Doctorate in  Education from  NOVA Southeastern University and a Doctorate of Nurisng Practice from New York University.  Dr. Mighten’s clinical background incorporates medical/surgical, emergency medicine, orthopedic and psychiatric mental health nursing.  She has served as faculty at Medgar Evers College/School of Nursing (Brooklyn) and at SUNY Downstate College of Nursing (Brooklyn).  Dr. Althea Mighten is currently in the role of Director of Nursing Education/Recruitment and Coordinator for Professional Practice in Nursing. Additional expertise lies in the areas of adult learning, professional practice, evidence-based practice and quality improvement.

Abstract:

There is a distinct and proven link between nursing leadership, nurse development and patient outcomes. Creating structures that empowers the nurses to engage and develop professionally will be essential to higher quality patient care and the levels of certification.

One empowering structure developed was the shared governance councils system. These councils recognized the professional responsibility of the registered nurse to achieve a highest level of competency that was exemplified by certification.  The recruitment and retention council utilized education fairs to promote certification. Other structure developed was recognition strategies that included wall plaques on each unit of those certified, awards during nurse’s week and involvement in the professional practice program, and financial incentives.

Certification rate is interwoven into the structures of the Professional Practice Model (Shared Decision Making, Reward and Recognition, Professional Relationships, and Care Delivery).  As part of the Nursing Strategic Plan a structure standard was created to support and encourage a culture of excellence by having a nurse specialty certification.  This included monetary incentives and reward recognition program including professional practice program or “clinical ladder”.
Outcomes:The relationship between structural empowerment and certification within the shared governance structure has been effective in raising certification rates to 46.6% which represents a 50% increase in 6 years. 28.8% of those who are certified have more than one certification in a nursing specialty. An exemplar was received on initial Magnet Designation. The 2014 NDNQI RN satisfaction survey for professional development was 67.5% and professional status was 69.6%, both were above the mean.

  • Nursing Education | Nursing Teaching Strategies | Innovations in Nursing Education | Advanced Nursing Practice
Location: Hampton Inn Tropicana and Event Center
Speaker

Chair

Patricia A Daoust

Massachusetts General Hospital, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Irene Kennedy

Glasgow Caledonian University, UK

Session Introduction

Jon Kelly and Heather Clark

Weber State University, USA

Title: Perfectionism among nursing students

Time : 11:10-12:00

Speaker
Biography:

Jon Kelly is an Assistant Professor of Nursing at the Weber State University School of Nursing, located in Utah. He teaches courses on the Associate, Bachelors, and Masters levels of Nursing. E-mail: jkelly@weber.edu

Heather Clark is an Assistant Professor of Nursing at the Weber State University School of Nursing. She teaches courses on the Associate, Bachelors, and Masters level of Nursing. E-mail: heatherclark2@weber.edu

Abstract:

Nursing is a demanding field with constant challenges.  Perfectionism has been shown to be a mediator of stress (Chang, 2012; Chang, 2006). A comparison of perfectionism among health profession students is lacking, and specifically lacking among nursing students. Perfectionism can cause maladaptive behaviors that may interfere with a student’s education and well-being (Hewitt & Flett, 1991).  The hypothesis used in this study was, nursing students will show a higher rate of perfectionism than the general population. The subjects of this study consisted of a non-probability convenience sample of nursing students at a large United States western university. The Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (MPS; Hewitt & Flett, 1991) was utilized to evaluate perfectionism among nursing students in this study.  Three specific areas are measured, which includes self-oriented perfectionism, other oriented perfectionism, and socially prescribed perfectionism. The data was analyzed by converting MPS survey scores to simple T-scores. The mean scores are set at 50 and the standard deviation is set at 10. The study results revealed 160 (65%) students scored moderate to elevated levels and 118 (48%) students demonstrated elevated levels of perfectionism in the self-perfectionism. In the other-oriented perfectionism category, 123 (50%) students presented moderate to elevated levels and 74 (30%) students that demonstrated elevated levels in other perfectionism.  The social perfectionism category showed 112 (46 %) students scored moderate to elevated levels and 71 (29%) students that scored elevated levels of perfectionism in social perfectionism category.  Educators may be able to adapt curriculum to alleviate stressors of health profession students.  Individual instructors need to also become educated on perfectionism, and then help students at risk by providing resources.  Instructors should also become mindful on individual classes that may trigger perfectionism in students.

Patricia A Daoust

Massachusetts General Hospital, USA

Title: Improving global nursing education exchange by improving cultural transition

Time : 12:00-12:25

Speaker
Biography:

Patricia A Daoust is the Director of Nursing for Global Health at Massachusetts General Hospital. She sets the vision, operationalizes and provides leadership to all global nursing initiatives related to the organizations mission. Presently she is also serving as the Interim Director of MGH - Global Health. The reach and impact of her work spans three decades and two continents. Her career trajectory is characterized by her enduring commitment to health as a human right and her dedication to the nursing profession. She has been the recipient of multiple awards including the Nursing Leadership Award by Sigma Theta Tau International, ANAC Public Service Award, AIDS Action Committee Heroes in Action Award, and the MGH Linda Kelly Visiting Scholar Recognition Award. She serves as the Global Committee Member for the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care and the Board Member of the Global Nursing Caucus.

Abstract:

Massachusetts General Hospital-Global Health Nursing enhances the status and reach of nursing on a global scale by focusing on nursing education, leadership and professional advocacy. We work collaboratively with our nurse colleagues in schools of nursing and healthcare facilities in resource limited settings primarily in Uganda and Tanzania. Through our global nurse fellowship program, we provide valuable theoretical and clinical expertise in direct response to requests from our academic partners. Although recognized as leaders in the field of nursing education, the cultural transition that any nurse must make to work effectively in a developing country cannot be underestimated. In order to appropriately equip our visiting faculty, we have developed a pre-departure curriculum that helps ease the transition of living and teaching in another culture thus increasing the likelihood of a successful experience that is mutually beneficial. Considering the essential role that a well-educated nurse plays, it is vital that we better prepare our global nurse educators for the challenges they will confront in order to make informed behavioral decisions, and use teaching strategies that are culturally appropriate and impactful. We provide 10 tips that have been shown to enhance the international experience and we teach participants to recognize 5 stages of cultural adaptation. The curriculum contrasts the roles and responsibilities of the nurse in developing countries, the educational variances, and specific health system structures. Our goal is to share our experiences with other global nursing educational initiatives so that learning is enhanced and global nurse educators are empowered.

Speaker
Biography:

Renae Dougal completed her Master's Degree from Gonzaga University, Spokane, Washington, USA. Currently, she is a Clinical Assistant Professor, School of Nursing, Accelerated BSN Program for Idaho State University, Meridian, Idaho, USA.She is also a Nurse Researcher, Author, Text Contributor, Presenter for both National & International conferences, a Certified Legal Nurse Consultant and On-site Evaluator for the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE).

 

Abstract:

Problem: The Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) Committee was changed to an EBP Nursing Council.  The purpose was to integrate the council within the Hospital's Shared-Governance model; this change brought new members to the Council. These individuals voiced a strong desire to learn the EBP process. However, a lack of understanding about the process of EBP was identified and an education plan was developed.

Evidence: Barriers associated with the EBP process include lack of understanding and value of EBP to individual practice, how to search for and grade evidence, difficulty understanding research articles, lack of computer skills and accessing electronic databases.

Strategy: A qualitative pilot survey was conducted with the Council. Based on results, an education plan was tailored to overcome identified barriers.

Practice Change: The intervention included: 1) education on the Iowa Model, 2) the hospital librarian demonstrated electronic searches through search engines and databases, 3) group participation in writing PICO questions, 4) clinical practice guidelines evaluated using the AGREE tool and 5) Rapid Critical Appraisals for research.

Evaluation: The survey’s primary question asked participants (n=16) to rank the top three barriers to using research in practice. From the identified primary barriers, 81.25% of the participants reported lacking necessary skills to critique or synthesize literature.

Results: Our concern was validated that nursing lacked necessary skills to utilize foundational principles of EBP. To have EBP successfully embedded into nursing practice a strong foundation is critical.

Recommendations:  Based on the results of the pilot survey, the EBP Council felt the next step was to survey the nursing staff, throughout the hospital, in order to identify perceived barriers in using EBP and understand their beliefs about EBP.

Lessons Learned: Promoting a culture of inquiry is vital to advancing nursing practice based on best available evidence.  By overcoming barriers, nurses feel confident in their ability to incorporate best evidence into their practice, which promotes best practice, improving nursing satisfaction and overall patient outcomes.

Julie A Bulson

Spectrum Health System, USA

Title: Nursing Process and Critical Thinking Linked to Disaster Preparedness

Time : 12:50-13:15

Speaker
Biography:

Julie Bulson MPA, BSN, RN, NE-BC has nearly 40 years experience in healthcare (30 years in healthcare emergency preparedness) and currently serves as Director, Emergency Preparedness overseeing emergency preparedness program development for Spectrum Health, a large healthcare system in the Midwest (10 acute care hospitals; level one adult and pediatric trauma centers; regional burn center; long term care sites; several urgent care centers; a large medical group [>700 providers]; and a national insurance provider). She participates on many state/regional/community planning committees. She has presented at several national emergency preparedness conferences and has co-authored several articles related to healthcare emergency preparedness.

Abstract:

Often times during a disaster situation, staff forget what they are supposed to do to effectively respond and care for patients already in the hospital as well as preparing for a surge of patients.  Disaster preparedness is not unlike the nursing process.  If as nurses we can reflect on something familiar and translate that practice into a crisis situation, it may become easier to respond in an unfamiliar situation.  This lecture is about how nurses responding during a disaster situation is similar to their day to day use of the nursing process...Assess, Diagnose, Plan, Implement, Evaluate.  We will review each step of the nursing process and what would be expected of a staff nurse during a mass casualty situation.

Speaker
Biography:

Francine B. Jensen is an Assistant Professor of Nursing at Utah Valley University where she teaches at the associate and bachelors levels. Prior to teaching, Ms. Jensen spent eight years in gastrointestinal, telemetry, emergency and trauma nursing at the University of Virginia Medical Center, Yale-New Haven Hospital, and Inova Fairfax Level I Trauma Center. She has presented at international nursing conferences in Tallin, Estonia, and the Netherlands. Her research interests center around interpersonal relationships in nursing and ways to improve engagement for students in the classroom.  She received her Masters from George Mason University and is a current doctoral student.

Nyree-Dawn Nichols has  been a nurse for 12 years.  Her medical background has been in Emergency Medicine, Trauma and Critical Care. She has 5 years fulltime teaching experience. Teaching students has been very rewarding and her passion for teaching grows continually.  She is married with 4 children and loves being a mom. 

Abstract:

With increasing immigrants and expanding globalization in the US, enriching cultural competence among healthcare providers to deliver culturally appropriate care to diverse patients is in need. Nursing education has recognized the challenges for integrating components of cultural competence into curriculum and examining the effectiveness of teaching and learning of cultural competence in a nursing program. The purpose of this comparative quantitative study was to conduct an ongoing evaluation of cultural competence among undergraduate nursing students through an academic semester. A convenience sample of all undergraduate nursing students was recruited from a university by sending 210 email invitation letters for participation. The IAPCC-SV© tool developed in 2007 by Campinha-Bacote was used to evaluate the level of cultural competence including the five subscales of cultural awareness, cultural desire, cultural knowledge, cultural skill, and cultural encounters among undergraduate nursing students at the beginning and at the end of a semester, respectively. In total, 106 students were randomly selected and voluntarily participated in this study to complete the IAPCC-SV at the beginning of the semester and 86 out of the 106 students completed the IAPCC-SV at the end of the semester. All data using double entry were analyzed via independent t-test to identify the difference in cultural competence between the beginning and the end of the semester among undergraduate nursing students. The study results indicated that the undergraduate nursing students were culturally competent and had an increased cultural competence level at the end of the semester compared to the beginning of the semester. Although the participating students had increased scores in all five subscales, there were no significant differences between the beginning and the end of the semester. Cultural competence is on-going process. It is suggested that curriculum can offer more cultural encounters and practice to interact with diverse patients to increase student cultural competence.

Irene Kennedy

Glasgow Caledonian University, UK

Title: Return to Practice Nursing Programme – attracting nurses back to the profession

Time : 14:25-14:50

Speaker
Biography:

Irene Kennedy is a senior lecturer from Glasgow Caledonian University and has an MSc and PGCHE from Edinburgh Napier Unviersity. She is the programme leader for the Return to Practice Nursing programme. She has recently won the Student Nursing Times Awards for the best Return to Practice Course 2016.

Abstract:

Workforce planning in Scotland suggests there will be a need for an increased number of nurses to meet service, quality and safety needs within Health and Social Care settings. Whilst Scottish Government have been increasing education commisions in recent years, these will not start to yield an increase in registered nursing staff numbers until 2017/18 at the earliest and other options had to be considered.Having established links with our local NHS Boards and NES, the Return to Practice nursing programme was developed collaboratively with users and carers and service providers who are committed to providing a programme to encourage nurses with a lapse of registration back into the workfocre and ensuring they are prepared to deliver quality based patient focused care.The programme is funded by Scottish Government and has recently won the Student Nursing Times Award 2016. Flexibility in the blended pattern of delivery ensures all students can accomodate their studying around other commitments and is truly student centred ensuring progression is high and attrition low. The  course takes the specific demands and interests of return to practice students as its driving force, encouraging its students to publish and placement staff to work closely with the students.

Agnes Makhene

University of Johannesburg, South Africa

Title: Classroom Conversations and the Use of Dialectical Dialogue to Facilitate Critical Thinking

Time : 14:50-15:15

Speaker
Biography:

Agnes Makhene has expertise in nursing education. Her main field of interest is critical thinking and has recently developed a programme to facilitate critical thinking in nursing education. Furthermore she designed a conceptual framework that can be used in the facilitation of critical thinking. The conceptual framework and programme are based on the Delphi technique recommendations post the conceptual analysis of “Critical Thinking” by Facione (1990). 

Abstract:

Classroom conversation is mandatory in a classroom that aims to develop the learners’ critical thinking skills. Critical thinking is facilitated in general and in nursing education particularly in order to aid learners to render care in diverse multicultural patient care settings. Classroom conversation involves thinking as an interactive process that constitutes the use of dialectics and dialogue. However where the aim is to facilitate critical thinking the conversation cannot be haphazard. Conversation in the classroom must have structure as it happens in dialectical dialogue. This paper aims to explore and describe how dialectical dialogue can be used in classroom conversations to facilitate critical thinking. A qualitative, exploratory research design was used. Purposive sampling method was used to draw a sample and Miles and Huberman methodology of qualitative data analysis was used to analyse data. Lincoln and Guba’s strategies were employed to ensure trustworthiness, while Dhai and McQuoid-Mason’s principles of ethical consideration were employed. The conceptualisation of findings culminated in the formulation of guidelines on how dialectical dialogue can be used to facilitate critical thinking in the classroom.

Teresa Marshall

Tacoma Community College, USA

Title: International nursing education – Nursing in Haiti

Time : 15:15-15:40

Speaker
Biography:

Teresa Marshall has lead medical teams to Haiti for the past six years. She has firsthand observed the cultural awareness that this experience has provided and how it changes the practice of nursing in the participants. Ms. Marshall is currently serving as an undergrad nursing instructor at Tacoma Community College, and a graduate clinical nursing instructor for Washington State University, and Gonzaga University. She has owned and operated her own independent nurse practice in rural. Her experience as an instructor has provided insight into how students learn best.   

Abstract:

Cultural competence and respect for others becomes especially important for us in nursing practice because we are patient advocates.  In school, we are taught to respect the rights and dignity of all patients. As the world becomes smaller and individuals and societies become more mobile, we are increasingly able to interact with individuals from other cultures.

Diversity is part of the heritage of America.  Other than the Native Americans, our ancestors were all immigrants from diverse cultures.  That diversity continues today and with the ease of travel the chance that you will encounter a patient from another culture is very likely.  Due to these factors, the development of cultural competence in nursing practice is important for us to provide the best care possible.  The first step is to become aware of other cultures and belief systems. Health care beliefs can be very different from culture to culture and country to country.  Without exposure to different beliefs and culture it can be difficult to understand patient’s behavior. 

One innovation in nursing education that addresses this need is global nursing immersions.  Global immersions can provide exposure to diverse cultures and better understanding of their beliefs.  Over the last six years Ms. Marshall has taken teams of nurses to Haiti to provide health education and training to village healthcare workers.  The nurse’s exposure to this diverse culture changed their nursing practice and better equipped them with the ability to understand and work within a different culture.  

Tanya Parker

NYU Langone Hospital for Joint Diseases, USA

Title: Simulated Mock Safety Team Assessment Response (S.T.A.R.) Code

Time : 16:00-16:25

Speaker
Biography:

Tanya Parker has been an RN for over 20 years and has worked in inpatient, outpatient, and academic settings. She is a New York certified teacher, a nationally certified basic life support instructor, and a preventing and managing crisis situations instructor. Ms. Parker has been acknowledged as rookie of the year for her quality teaching of vocational students, has received funding to support a vocational nursing assistant program, and has developed a nurse internship program at an established health center. She has contributed to a hospital nursing recognition program to coordinate the creation, display, and publication of nursing artwork. Ms. Parker has presented her work on workplace violence in both domestic and international settings. Her work is published in the American Journal of Nursing and the Nursing Management Journal. Her master’s level interests were nursing, and health education and promotion. She is currently pursuing a doctorate in nursing practice.

 

Abstract:

Background: Health care workers are at high risk for workplace violence. The most up-to-date research reports indicate there is an increase in violent crime in hospitals. Mount Sinai Beth Israel (MSBI) in New York City created committee to address the concerns of increased workplace violence; the outcome was the Safety Team Assessment Response (S.T.A.R.) Code Policy. The S.T.A.R. Code Policy outlines a response system to activate a formal interdisciplinary program to prevent or mitigate violent situations regarding patients, visitors and or staff.

Purpose:  The purpose of this quality improvement project was to test an educational program, including simulation techniques, aimed to improve the knowledge and skills of RNs and PCAs by increasing their exposure to aspects of the S.T.A.R. Code Policy.  Outcomes of the simulation program included increasing confidence, comfort levels about when to call a code and how to perform, during the code, skills in implementing a code, and responsibilities during and following the code.

Methodology: Key elements of the S.T.A.R. Code Policy were reviewed using Power Point slides, the nursing staff participated in two simulated scenarios based on each level of the S.T.A.R. Codes. A debriefing session followed each simulated scenario. Participants completed a 10-item multiple choice test and a Mock S.T.A.R. Code Skills Checklist.

Results: All participants achieved 100% scores on the competency exams. The study sample was one of convenience and is not generalizable beyond MSBI. 

Conclusions/Implications for Practice: Employees working on units with high-risk populations may be at greater risk for encountering workplace violence. Violence prevention training should be included in hospital orientation programs for all staff.  This educational program became a required competency for all nursing staff in the PCS Department.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Sherry Donaworth is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Nursing at the University of Cincinnati, College of Nursing. She is board certified as both an Adult-Acute Care Nurse Practitioner and a Family Nurse Practitioner. Her extensive clinical practice experience has included critical care, cardiology, geriatrics as well as primary care. As lead faculty for advanced pharmacology and clinical management of adult health problems, she has utilized the “flipped classroom” and advanced technology in teaching, for both onsite and distance learners. Dr. Donaworth served as a content expert on an ANE HRSA grant for interactive case studies for distance learning students.

Abstract:

Statement of the Problem: Interprofessional healthcare teams are becoming the norm in healthcare delivery. Opportunities for safe non-threatening interactions among interprofessional learners is essential to development of communication skills among student learners (Fanning & Gaba, 2007). Participation in provider neutral interactive case studies (ICS) allows students the opportunity for critical thinking in real-world scenarios (Colella, Rota, & Beery, 2015). Simulation provides an excellent opportunity to address interprofessional education needs and ultimately enhance collaborative practice. Face to face debriefing has been well established as an accepted method of reinforcing concepts presented during the simulation, but what happens when interprofessional debriefing occurs at a distance? Strategy/Intervention: At a large urban academic health center, advanced practice nursing students and medical students completed a provider-neutral Interactive case study (ICS). An interprofessional faculty team developed scenarios using the core competencies for interprofessional collaborative practice as a framework (Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel, 2011; 2016). Incorporation of distance learning students into synchronous interprofessional debriefing was accomplished using a conferencing software program. Interprofessional faculty facilitators set the tone as nonthreatening and encouraged open dialogue among students. Findings: Evaluations from both the nurse practitioner students and medical students were overwhelming positive with 83% of participants reporting the activity as valuable to their education. The debriefing afforded learners to develop a clearer perspective of each profession’s specific roles as part of the team. In addition, this teaching strategy offers faculty an opportunity to assess the student’s grasp of the concepts evaluated within the case and to guide the learners in becoming part of a cohesive interprofessional team. Interprofessional simulation debriefing is a dynamic teaching technique that can facilitate positive interaction among student learners.

Speaker
Biography:

Commander Eric Pauli is an active-duty Navy Nurse who completed his MSN in the Psychiatric Mental Health Nurse Practitioner Program (PMHNP) at the University of Washington in 2008 and is currently enrolled as a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) student in the Nurse Executive Programat Old Dominion University.  He serves as Assistant Professor and Director for Clincial Education in the PMHNP-DNP Program at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.  CDR Pauli has been published in two peer-reviewed journal articles on UsingSimulation in Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Education and Meeting the Challenges of Training for  Interdisciplinary Care. 

Abstract:

The US Military repealed the “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” policy five years ago. In July 2016, the military lifted a ban on transgendered service members, effectively allowing Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgendered (LGBT) service members the right to openly serve. Despite this action, the military has not developed or deployed specific education across the Military Healthcare System regarding healthcare disparities and needs of LGBT service members and their families. The purpose of this research is to know the effectiveness of an interdisciplinary seminar on changing military graduate nursing students’ and military medical students’ attitudes and knowledge of LGBT individuals and their healthcare needs. A 17-item survey was administered to a sample of 200 students before and after a class on sexual diversity. Findings show improvement on all questions with statistically significant improvement noted for knowledge of LGBT healthcare disparities. More education like this may be warranted.

Speaker
Biography:

George McNally completed his master’s degree in advanced nursing from the University of Auckland. He is a lecturer of anatomy and physiology at the school of nursing Northtec Whangarei New Zealand    

Abstract:

Smartphones, tablets and the adjunct applications (apps) that operate on them are becoming a part ofeveryday life for the New Zealand population. Student nurses have embraced this technology, but littleis known internationally or in New Zealand about the way student nurses may apply personal devicesto their education process. The perceptions of New Zealand nurse managers, toward these personalreferencing technologies, could not be located. Using a qualitative descriptive methodology, semistructured interviews were conducted with New Zealand student nurses (n=13), and nurse managers(n=5) about their perceptions of use of personal smartphones, tablets and applications as an educational tool in clinical settings. A thematic analysis was conducted on the resulting text. Student nurses wanted to use personal smartphones to support clinical decisions. Nurse managers perceived the use of personal smartphones as unprofessional, and do not trust younger cohorts of student nurses to act ethically when using a personal smartphone. This research supports historical research findings about the perceived usefulness of hand held referencing to augment clinical decisions. However, due to the perceptions held by nurse mangers surrounding professionalism, as well as financial considerations, the application of personal smartphones to clinical practice may remain problematic.